Oregon Beach News, Thursday 9/8 – Red Flag Warnings for Oregon Coast and Possible Power Shutdowns, Astoria Port Commission Votes to Start Repairs on Pier 2

The latest news stories across the state of Oregon from the digital home of the Oregon coastal cities, OregonBeachMagazine.com

Thursday, September 8, 2022

Oregon Beach Weather

Active Weather Alerts – NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

RED FLAG WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 11 AM FRIDAY TO 8 PM PDT SATURDAY FOR WIND AND LOW RELATIVE HUMIDITY FOR FIRE WEATHER 

The National Weather Service in Portland has issued a Red Flag Warning for wind and low relative humidity, which is in effect from 11 AM Friday to 8 PM PDT Saturday. The Fire Weather Watch is no longer in effect.

* AFFECTED AREA...In Oregon, Fire Weather Zone 601 North Oregon Coast and Fire Weather Zone 612 Central Oregon Coast. 

* WINDS...Northeast 10 to 20 mph with gusts up to 35 mph.

* RELATIVE HUMIDITY...As low as 20 percent.

* IMPACTS...Conditions may be favorable for rapid fire spread which may threaten life and property. Use extra caution with potential ignition sources, especially in grassy areas.
Outdoor burning is not recommended.

SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY ISSUED: 3:12 AM SEP. 8, 2022 – NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

...HAZARDOUS SEAS WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 5 AM PDT SATURDAY...
...SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 11 AM FRIDAY TO 5 AM PDT SATURDAY...

* WHAT...For the Hazardous Seas Warning, very steep and hazardous seas 9 to 13 ft at 7 seconds. North winds 15 to 25 kt with gusts up to 30 kt.

* WHERE...For the Hazardous Seas Warning, all waters. The worst conditions will be a mile or two offshore.

* WHEN...For the Hazardous Seas Warning, until 5 AM PDT Saturday. For the Small Craft Advisory, from 11 AM Friday to 5 AM PDT Saturday.

* IMPACTS...Very steep and hazardous seas could capsize or damage vessels. Bar crossings will become especially treacherous.

* View the hazard area in detail at https://go.usa.gov/x6hks

With high winds expected amid hot weather, PGE and Pacific Power both say they could shut off power for thousands of customers between Friday and Saturday.

Utility companies Portland General Electric and Pacific Power announced Thursday that they could initiate public safety power shutoffs for areas of multiple counties over the next several days due to the threat of high winds and extreme wildfire conditions.

“Our advanced weather modeling is indicating a potential for dangerous fire weather conditions,” said Steve Vanderburg, meteorology manager for Pacific Power. “We’re gaining an understanding of the impacts to our system this specific weather event could bring, and have issued Public Safety Power Shutoff notices to several Pacific Power communities.”

Specifically, the shutoff could apply to areas of Stayton east through the Santiam Canyon, Lebanon, Sweet Home, Lincoln City and Glide east along Umpqua Highway.

Pacific Power cited a forecast that includes extremely low humidity, dry vegetation, elevated levels on key weather indexes and expected sustained winds. This could happen as early as 12 a.m. Friday morning.

Astoria Port Commission Votes to Start Repairs on Pier 2

Over the years Pier 2 has become a crumbling piece of infrastructure. It hosts seafood processors critical to the region’s fishing industry and now will undergo more emergency repairs by the Port of Astoria.

The Port Commission voted unanimously on Tuesday to approve an emergency expense of $50,000 that will go toward bolstering the west side of Pier 2, which has a failing seawall and rotting decking, with steel plates.

Missing Endangered Person out of Newport

May be an image of 2 people, outdoors and text that says 'MISSING ENDANGERED PERSON NEWPORT OREGO Dawn Marie Catalano Age: 47 Sex: Female Race: White Height: 5' 5" Weight: 153 lbs Hair: Red Eyes: Blue Tattoos: Two light pink flowers on each forearm; unknown design on lower back Vehicle: White Ford Focus OR license 549MVX Last seen September 3, 2022 at residence in Newport, OR Case #22N-01731 Newport Police Department 541-574-3348 or call 911 if you have any information.'

Dawn Marie Catalano — Dawn was last seen at her residence in Newport on September 3, 2022. She was reported missing on September 7, 2022. Dawn made a comment to her landlord that she was going to Hawaii. Prior to being reported missing, Dawn was contacted by law enforcement during a traffic stop on September 5, 2022, driving a white Ford Focus, Oregon license plate #549MVX in Bandon, Oregon.

Dawn is described as being 5’05”, 153 pounds with red hair and blue eyes. Dawn also wears a brown colored wig. Dawn is reported to have a tattoo on her lower back, unknown what design, and two light pink flower tattoos on each forearm. It is unknown what Dawn was wearing when she left. Dawn is considered missing and endangered.

If you see her or know her whereabouts, call 911. Please contact Officer Emma Paranto with any additional information at 541-574-3348 or e.paranto@newportpolice.net and reference case number 22N-001731. You may also use our tip hotline and leave a voice message at 541-574-5455, or text-a-tip to 541-270-1856. Thank you!

Wildfire Threat Grows Across Region

Hot, dry, and windy conditions are threatening to worsen wildfires burning across Oregon, which have consumed over 100,000 acres of land and prompted evacuations in southern and northeastern Oregon.

Strong easterly winds are expected to develop over the Cascades and throughout Western Oregon late Thursday night. East winds will last through Friday evening. Strong easterly winds are expected to develop over the Cascades and throughout Western Oregon late Thursday night.

East winds will last through Friday evening. Strong easterly winds are expected to develop over the Cascades and throughout Western Oregon late Thursday night. East winds will last through Friday evening.

Four fires have scorched more than a combined 90,000 acres in the northeastern corner of Oregon, prompting airspace restrictions, an evacuation order and temporary closures within the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest.

Helicopters, air tankers and over 700 firefighters and personnel are responding to the Double Creek firewhich has burned nearly 60,000 acres near the community of Imnaha in Wallowa County. Lightning about 10 miles southeast of Imnaha sparked the fire Aug. 30. A level 3 “go now” evacuation was ordered for Hat Point and Freezeout Roads, as a dry thunderstorm forecasted for Wednesday afternoon threatens to bring wind gusts of up to 50 miles per hour.

Three other lightning-caused conflagrations in northeastern Oregon – Nebo, Sturgill and Goat Mountain Two – are burning in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, threatening campgrounds, private property and U.S. Forest Service infrastructure.

The Nebo fire, located about 21 miles southeast of Enterprise in Wallowa County, has consumed nearly 10,000 acres. Airspace restrictions are in place as firefighting aircraft try to quell the flames from above.

The Wallowa County Sheriff’s Office issued evacuation orders near the Sturgill fire, which has burned through nearly 17,000 acres south of the community of Lostine in Wallowa County.

Less than 200 acres have burned due to the Goat Mountain Two fire, which is being monitored from lookouts and aircrafts.

Van Meter Fire currently burning on Stukel Mountain KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. — The Van Meter fire is currently burning on Stukel Mountain just southeast of Klamath Falls. The fire was reported this afternoon at 12:24. The fire is burning on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Lakeview District and the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) protected lands. It is currently estimated to be 800-1,000 acres and spreading rapidly. The cause is under investigation. Lightning was observed in the area late this morning.

The following evacuations are in effect.- Level 3 (Go): Crystal Springs Rd east of Hill Rd. South Poe Valley Rd from Crystal Springs Rd to Weber Rd.- Level 1 (Ready): Harpold Rd west to Hill Rd. North of Taylor Rd, just north of the town Merrill. Currently the fire is under unified command between the Oregon Department of Forestry, Klamath County Sheriff’s office, and Klamath County Fire District 1. There are multiple ground and air resources currently on the fire. The public is asked to stay away from the fire area for safety reasons. A local type 3 Incident Management team is currently being ordered to take command of the fire. Keep up to date on the evacuation order through the Klamath County Emergency Hotline at 541-205-9730.

More than 800 firefighters are battling the Cedar Creek fire about 15 miles east of Oakridge in Lane County. The fire, which has prompted multiple evacuations in Lane and Deschutes counties, had burned over 18,000 acres and was 12% contained by Wednesday afternoon. Steep terrain with roadless areas and wilderness has challenged firefighters, according to the National Wildfire Coordinating Group.

The Rum Creek fire in unincorporated Josephine County is 42% contained and has consumed more than 20,000 acres. Nearly 1,700 firefighters and personnel have responded to the area, and structures are being threatened in communities of Rand and Galice. Burning debris is rolling down slopes, spreading the flames, and forecasters warn that warm and dry air moving into the region could worsen conditions. A heat advisory is also in effect in the area.

Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest firefighting resources ready to respond

The National Weather Service has forecast challenging weather conditions for firefighters over the next several days, and the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest firefighters remain at the ready.

A Red Flag Warning has been issued today, Tuesday, and into the night for gusty winds and low relative humidity for much of the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest (RRSNF). An additional Red Flag Warning has also been issued for dry thunderstorms with gusty outflow winds on Wednesday for the southeast portion of the RRSNF.

The RRSNF has maintained firefighting resources ready to respond throughout the forest to provide initial attack on any new starts whether human or lightning caused and is importing additional assets due to the increased threat. These resources will continue to be pre-positioned in strategic locations to provide efficient response to any reports of smoke.

While a cool down is forecast for the beginning of the next work week, everyone must remain vigilant in the prevention of fires as fuels are extremely dry and receptive to any ignition source. Campfire usage is restricted in much of Southern Oregon, so Know Before You Go by checking the requirements before heading out. If campfires are allowed at your camping destination, be sure that it is completely out and cold to the touch before leaving.

Current Restrictions on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest

The Wild and Scenic Lower Rogue River remains in Stage 2 Public Use Restrictions. https://bit.ly/3AvyR0e

The Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest remains in Stage 1 Public Use Restrictions across the Forest. Campfires are not permitted on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest unless it is in an approved metal ring and in an open recreation site listed here. https://bit.ly/3Ps6fte

The Forest remains at IFPL2 for Commercial operations. https://bit.ly/3SXlY6z

With high winds expected amid hot weather, PGE and Pacific Power both say they could shut off power for thousands of customers between Friday and Saturday.

Utility companies Portland General Electric and Pacific Power announced Thursday that they could initiate public safety power shutoffs for areas of multiple counties over the next several days due to the threat of high winds and extreme wildfire conditions.

Pacific Power said that a notice went out to roughly 12,000 customers between Linn, Douglas, Lincoln, Tillamook, Marion and Polk counties. The warning applies from early Friday morning through Saturday.

Utility companies Portland General Electric and Pacific Power announced Thursday that they could initiate public safety power shutoffs for areas of multiple counties over the next several days due to the threat of high winds and extreme wildfire conditions.

Pacific Power said that a notice went out to roughly 12,000 customers between Linn, Douglas, Lincoln, Tillamook, Marion and Polk counties. The warning applies from early Friday morning through Saturday.

PGE’s power shutoffs could impact even more people, an estimated 30,000 customers in 10 areas. The company said it intends to provide up to four hours’ notice before shutting off power.

“Based on current information, PGE estimates a PSPS could be called on Friday morning, and power could be out through Saturday night,” the company said in a statement. “Assuming this event duration and no damage to our system, power restoration would begin Sunday morning and power to customers could be restored by Monday night.”

An interactive map on the PGE website shows exactly where those areas are — namely the outskirts of the Portland metro area in rural areas outside of Sandy, Estacada, Molalla, Silverton, McMinnville and Forest Grove.

“Strong east winds will develop across western Oregon Friday and last into Saturday,” “While these will be the strongest east winds we’ve seen since February, they will not be as strong as the east winds of September 2020. And they won’t last as long. The winds will back off Saturday evening.”

Pacific Power has been accused of starting or contributing to the devastating Oregon wildfires in September 2020 when their equipment failed during that historic wind event.

Public safety power shutoffs in areas at high risk of seeing extreme wildfire conditions have been increasingly adopted as a means of avoiding these risks. PGE and Pacific Power have each used them in the past, but they were not employed widely enough during the 2020 event to address all areas impacted by extreme wildfire conditions.

OHA begins reporting new demographic data for monkeypox cases

Publication of REALD, SOGI data reflects effort to better understand diversity in Oregon, address health disparities

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today began publishing monthly reports of monkeypox (hMPXV) case data by sexual orientation or gender identity, and by expanded categories of race and ethnicity.

Publication of the data, in consultation with OHA’s Equity and Inclusion Division (OEI), will help the agency better understand the diversity of the people living in Oregon, which will help it identify and address health disparities and support data justice in communities most affected by health disparities.

The monkeypox outbreak is the first communicable disease outbreak for which OHA is publicly reporting sexual orientation or gender identity (SOGI) data, and data from expanded race and ethnicity categories found in REALD, or race and ethnicity, language or disability. The data will be reported each month on OHA’s monkeypox (hMPXV) website.

“OHA has established a strategic goal to achieve health equity by 2030,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA. “A critical component to meeting this goal is ensuring meaningful access to services for everyone in Oregon, regardless of their race, ethnicity, language, disability, or sexual orientation and gender identity. The REALD and SOGI data will help guide OHA and its partners in an equitable response to the monkeypox outbreak.”

In 2021, the Oregon Legislature passed House Bill 3159, which charged OHA with drafting and adding SOGI questions to the current data collection standards in OHA Oregon Administrative Rules; building a data collection system for both REALD and SOGI; and developing and implementing reporting requirements.

In 2018, OHA’s Equity and Inclusion Division convened a Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data Collection Committee. The group consists of internal and external stakeholders who interact with the LGBTQ+ community and health systems, many of whom identify as LGBTQ+ themselves.

The Oregon Legislature passed House Bill 3159 in 2021, charging OHA with drafting and adding SOGI questions to the current data collection standards in OHA Oregon Administrative Rules, building a data collection system for both REALD and SOGI and developing and implementing reporting requirements. The SOGI Data Collection Committee draft data collection standards have been implemented in Oregon’s public health communicable disease data collection system known as Orpheus.

OHA and local public health partners have been collecting SOGI information from people diagnosed with monkeypox since the start of the outbreak in Oregon.

While the narrative of monkeypox in the United States has centered on cisgender gay men as the population most affected by the virus, this narrative does not reflect the full spectrum of people who have been affected by monkeypox. The SOGI will help illuminate the experiences of people with other gender identities and sexual orientations in the Oregon outbreak of monkeypox, Sidelinger said.

OHA shifts COVID-19 reporting; bivalent boosters arrive in Oregon

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today announced changes to its reporting of COVID-19 data and provided an update on the new bivalent COVID-19 boosters. State health officials also gave an update on monkeypox (hMPXV) in Oregon, including new demographic data and recommendations for monkeypox vaccines.

OHA Director Patrick Allen said COVID-19 data reporting is changing next week, with the COVID-19 Data Update moving to a weekly schedule and other data moving to a monthly cycle. “Shifting our reporting to match where we are in the pandemic will also allow us to free up resources that can be used for responding to other public health events that are equally important,” Allen said.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D. MSEd, health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA, said the state has recorded fewer COVID-19-related cases and hospitalizations, but still has high levels of circulation based on wastewater and testing results.

Sidelinger encouraged all eligible Oregonians to get a newly approved COVID-19 booster as soon as they can. “As we head into fall, as more of us spend time indoors, the updated booster will be the best way to protect ourselves and those around us from severe illness and hospitalization caused by the predominant BA.5 and BA.4 COVID-19 subvariants,” he said.

Sidelinger also said OHA has counted 179 presumptive and confirmed cases of monkeypox as of today. He said Oregon has distributed, or is in the process of distributing, more than 40,080 doses of the Jynneos vaccine and 263 courses of the investigational antiviral drug known as tecovirimat — or TPOXX — since June 20. He encouraged people to talk to their providers about testing if they have symptoms of monkeypox (hMPXV). Providers should test their patients for the virus, even if it’s only suspected, based on a patient’s symptoms, he said.

A recording of today’s media availability can be found here. Allen’s and Sidelinger’s prepared remarks are published here.

Oregon's COVID-19 reporting frequency is changing. Starting Wednesday, September 14: COVID-19 data will be reported weekly (case numbers, hospitalizations, deaths and variant sequencing) on our social media and website, healthoregon.org/coronavirus. Some OHA reports will publish monthly (like the Vaccination Trends and Case Demographics and Disease Severity reports). We'll continue to keep you informed so that you can make decisions to keep your loved ones safe.

New dashboard focuses on cases, hospitalizations and deaths by vaccination status

The new dashboard will display information previously available in the Breakthrough Case Report and will highlight trends in cases, hospitalizations and deaths by vaccination status over time. Data are available at state and county levels. The updated dashboard aligns with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) COVID-19 hospitalizations by vaccination status dashboard.

The new dashboard data demonstrate that COVID-19 vaccines are very effective at protecting people from developing severe illness, being hospitalized and dying. COVID-19 vaccines are widely available and free to everyone in Oregon.

The new dashboard will replace the monthly Breakthrough Case Report, which will no longer be updated. The dashboard will be published for the first time on Sept. 8 and published on the second Wednesday of the month.

OHA shifts COVID-19 reporting frequency

OHA will stop distributing daily data updates on COVID-19 cases, testing and deaths, effective Sept. 14. Information about COVID-19 cases, current hospitalizations of COVID-19-positive patients and COVID-19-associated deaths, along with other COVID-19 data, will be made available weekly.

The daily data updates grew out of the urgent need to communicate quickly evolving COVID-19 trends early in the pandemic. Now, as cases and hospitalizations have declined, and the public has the information and tools to protect themselves, OHA is aligning resources with other public health needs.

The changes do not mean the pandemic is over. OHA will continue to monitor and report cases, deaths, hospitalizations, variants, vaccination and booster rates and other developments. These monitoring efforts include analyzing wastewater samples across the state to track COVID-19 spread.

Starting Sept. 14, OHA will update the following information on the Oregon COVID-19 Update dashboard every Wednesday. Key points will continue to be shared on OHA’s COVID-19 website, and on Twitter, Facebook and OHA Facebook en Espanol:

  • Newly reported and total COVID-19 cases
  • Newly reported and total COVID-19-associated deaths
  • Total current COVID-19-positive patients hospitalized
  • Percentage of statewide emergency department visits for COVID-19-like illness
  • Total newly reported COVID-19 tests and percent test positivity
  • Total variants of concern sequenced and the percentage of sequences by variant.

A new summary table dashboard with downloadable data will accompany the Oregon COVID-19 Update, updated every Wednesday.

In addition, the following dashboards will continue to be updated weekly on Wednesdays:

The cadence of other COVID-19 dashboards and reports will change starting Sept. 14. The following reports will be updated monthly on the second Wednesday of the month:

The following reports will be updated monthly on the second Thursday of the month:

The Oregon Health Care Workforce COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake dashboard will be updated quarterly, the COVID-19 Age Adjustment report will be updated annually and the Oregon COVID-19 Case and Vaccination Stories dashboard will be updated as needed.

Other COVID-19 reports will be archived and no longer updated starting Sept. 14:

Update planned for immunization data

Due to a data system error, COVID-19 vaccination data updated today will only show administrations submitted to the ALERT Immunization Information System through Aug 31. OHA anticipates the error will be resolved by Sept. 14.

Oregon District Attorneys Worry New State Hospital Stay Limits Will Affect Public Safety

District attorneys in Oregon are raising concerns about a new federal court order that will limit the amount of time patients can stay at the state’s psychiatric hospital.

Dozens of people across the state who’ve been accused of crimes and need mental health care are stuck in jail. That’s because there’s no room for them to be treated at the Oregon State Hospital.

A new ruling signed last week should free up more beds. A federal judge recently ordered the hospital to limit how long some patients can stay.

The ruling upholds a compromise recently reached by the state and disability rights advocates. But several Portland area district attorneys have concerns and say this move could pose a threat to public safety.

The majority of patients at the Oregon State Hospital are there because they’re facing criminal charges, but aren’t fit to stand trial. The state cannot prosecute someone for a crime if they don’t understand what’s happening to them. A stay at the state’s psychiatric hospital is meant to “restore” them to a state in which they are capable of working with an attorney to aid in their own defense.

Twenty years ago, a federal judge in Oregon issued a ruling that says the state hospital has to admit people within seven days. These are people coming from jails to the state hospital to get treatment.

In recent years, the hospital has struggled to admit people within that seven-day window, leaving many who are in various degrees of mental health crisis stuck in jail. As of Tuesday, 73 people were waiting in jails for admission to the hospital — many charged with crimes — in violation of the long-standing order.

Disability Rights Oregon and Metropolitan Public Defender have sued the state over this situation. They’ve tried to force the state to follow that old court order. The state has had staffing issues, there’s been COVID-19, and it’s a very challenging population to care for.

But finally, the two sides came to an agreement. And on September 1, U.S. District Court Judge Michael Mosman signed off on an unopposed motion to limit the amount of time people can stay at the state hospital.

The new rules grant:

  • 90 days for people charged with misdemeanors
  • six months for non-violent felonies
  • one year for violent charges that carry mandatory minimum sentences under Ballot Measure 11

Some district attorneys are worried that people will be released who are not actually better, many of whom are accused of violent crimes, and that those people will put the public at risk. Last year, Oregon lawmakers decided to spend some $350 million on the state hospital as well as other mental health programs. Some of that money has already increased capacity. But it’s also a lot of money and it will take time before it really has an effect.

Everyone seems to agree that the state lacks the capacity to care for these people accused of crimes and in need of mental health care that is maybe slightly less intensive than what is provided by the state hospital. Many who might be released earlier are through an initial crisis but are still in need of some care. But the solutions to that problem are complex.

Some worry that expanding the state hospital will grow an expensive system that the state would ultimately just fill with more patients until another backlog is created. Disability advocates are pushing for the state to offer different levels of care. Ideally, this would give officials a chance to intervene before someone would need to go to a hospital at all.

The Oregon Department of Fish And Wildlife Warns Dog Owners Of Salmon Carcasses Along Willamette Valley Rivers

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is warning Oregonians to keep their dogs away from dead salmon in the coming months. The dead salmon are part of an effort by ODFW to supply local ecosystems with essential nutrients, however, the carcasses can have a deadly effect on dogs.

Distribution of salmon carcasses to local rivers begins in September when salmon in Willamette Valley rivers gather to spawn and die. Over the years, salmon carcasses have given vital nutrients back to the ecosystem, ODFW says. They also serve as food for bears, otters, raccoons, skunks, turkey vultures, eagles, hawks, ravens and fertilize trees and vegetation along the stream banks.

After salmon spawn in ODFW hatcheries, staff and volunteers take the carcasses and distribute them throughout the Willamette Valley for stream enrichment.

“By returning hatchery brood salmon carcasses to local rivers and streams, their bodies can provide nutrients for algae and other aquatic plants, as well as food for aquatic invertebrates that in turn provide forage for larger species such as fish,” the ODFW said Wednesday.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is warning Oregonians to keep their dogs away from dead salmon in the coming months. The dead salmon are part of an effort by ODFW to supply local ecosystems with essential nutrients, however, the carcasses can have a deadly effect on dogs.

Distribution of salmon carcasses to local rivers begins in September when salmon in Willamette Valley rivers gather to spawn and die. Over the years, salmon carcasses have given vital nutrients back to the ecosystem, ODFW says. They also serve as food for bears, otters, raccoons, skunks, turkey vultures, eagles, hawks, ravens and fertilize trees and vegetation along the stream banks.

After salmon spawn in ODFW hatcheries, staff and volunteers take the carcasses and distribute them throughout the Willamette Valley for stream enrichment.

“By returning hatchery brood salmon carcasses to local rivers and streams, their bodies can provide nutrients for algae and other aquatic plants, as well as food for aquatic invertebrates that in turn provide forage for larger species such as fish,” the ODFW said Wednesday. MORE INFO: https://www.dfw.state.or.us/news/2022/09_Sep/090722.asp

The Oregon Department of Transportation today announced the opening of applications for the agency’s new Innovative Mobility Micro-Grants.

The $5,000 grants are the first project to come forward from the Innovative Mobility Program, a new initiative created in spring 2022.

The $20 million Innovative Mobility Program aims to make it easier for Oregonians to walk, bike, roll, share rides and take transit. The program has a special focus on equity and helping historically excluded groups get to where they need to go more quickly, cheaply and safely.

“There’s a major transportation evolution happening across the country, and we have a chance to make sure that communities of color and other marginalized individuals who have been excluded in the past have place, purpose and priority in Oregon’s future transportation investments,” said Alando Simpson, vice chair of the Oregon Transportation Commission. “The Innovative Mobility Program will combine new technologies and smarter partnerships to meet Oregon’s transportation needs in ways that are more equitable and climate-friendly than single-occupancy vehicles that run on fossil fuels.”

ODOT is currently engaging community-based organizations, transportation providers and the public on the kinds of services they want from the Innovative Mobility Program. You can help ODOT understand transportation needs in your community by taking the survey linked in English and Spanish.

“Safe and equitable access to public and active transportation is critical for the 1/3 of Oregonians who don’t have a car, as well as those who choose not to drive,” said Karyn Criswell, Public Transportation Division administrator. “While we engage the community in designing the program, micro-grants are a way that folks can start accessing innovative mobility funds right now.”

The micro-grant application form can be found here. Local governments, public transportation providers, Tribes and certified nonprofits are eligible and encouraged to apply. Organizations are limited to two grants in a 12-month period, and eligible activities include community events, safety education and awareness activities, maps, signage, bike helmets, racks and locks and repair stations.

https://www.oregon.gov/osp/missing/pages/missingpersons.aspx
May be an image of 2 people, outdoors and text that says 'MISSING ENDANGERED PERSON NEWPORT OREGO Dawn Marie Catalano Age: 47 Sex: Female Race: White Height: 5' 5" Weight: 153 lbs Hair: Red Eyes: Blue Tattoos: Two light pink flowers on each forearm; unknown design on lower back Vehicle: White Ford Focus OR license 549MVX Last seen September 3, 2022 at residence in Newport, OR Case #22N-01731 Newport Police Department 541-574-3348 or call 911 if you have any information.'

This is just a small compilation of missing women and their pictures in the area. There are of course women missing all over Oregon and men and children missing too. We don’t mean to dismiss that, however, there is an inordinate amount of women who go missing each week and there could possibly be a connection with an anomaly or two here and there. Sadly most of them never get any attention. Family and friends must keep any information going and lead investigations so that they aren’t just forgotten. 

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is shane.png

https://www.facebook.com/pg/Have-You-Seen-Me-Southern-Oregons-Missing-People-161249961222839/posts/

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