Oregon Beach News, Wednesday 6/5 – Next Coastal Community Meetings on Proposed Offshore Wind Leases in Florence and Newport, Echo Mountain Complex Fire Part of PacificCorp Settlement & Other Local and Statewide News…

The latest news stories across the state of Oregon from the digital home of the Oregon coastal cities, OregonBeachMagazine.com

Wednesday, June 5, 2024

Oregon Beach Weather

SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY ISSUED– NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

...SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 5 AM PDT FRIDAY...

* WHAT...North winds 20 to 25 kt with gusts to 30 kt this afternoon into Thursday. Steep seas of 11 to 13 ft at 15 seconds as a west swell builds into the waters tonight. Seas remain steep, but subside to 8 to 10 ft on Thursday as swell subsides and seas transition to wind driven.

* WHERE...All areas.

* WHEN...Until 5 AM PDT Friday.

* IMPACTS...Gusty winds and/or steep seas could capsize or damage smaller vessels.

* View the hazard area in detail at https://go.usa.gov/x6hks

Next Coastal Community Meetings on Proposed Offshore Wind Leases in Florence and Newport

The Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) will be hosting a series of community meetings along the Oregon coast related to a proposal by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) to lease areas of the ocean off Oregon’s coast to explore possibilities for wind energy development.

The proposed BOEM leases would authorize companies to study the areas off Oregon’s coast for potential offshore wind energy development projects. After obtaining leases, companies would perform activities in the ocean that may include placement of scientific buoys and collection of data about seafloor conditions, ocean habitats, and wildlife.

More information on the proposed leasing actions can be found at https://www.oregon.gov/lcd/OCMP/Pages/Offshore-Wind-Energy-Leasing.aspx.

BOEM’s proposed leasing action is not a proposal to permit the construction of an offshore wind project. A BOEM decision whether to approve a Construction and Operations Plan for a wind energy facility would be subject to a separate federal consistency review by the state, after some years of additional site assessment and project design.

As part of the state’s federal consistency review authority under the Coastal Zone Management Act, DLCD’s Oregon Coastal Management Program (OCMP) staff will review the proposed BOEM actions for consistency with current, enforceable Oregon coastal zone policies. The result of this review would be either to agree with BOEM’s proposed leasing actions, agree with conditions, or object to BOEM’s proposed actions. Enforceable policies in the coastal zone are existing state and local policies that have been approved by the NOAA Office for Coastal Management for use in federal consistency reviews, consistent with national Coastal Zone Management standards.

During the community meetings, OCMP staff will provide information about the proposed activities that are being reviewed and the applicable state policies and

authorities related to a consistency review. Community members are encouraged to provide comments on the consistency review during the 45-day comment period, which ends on June 15, 2024.

The community meetings will be an opportunity to provide comments in person which will be recorded by OCMP staff. The meeting program is as follows:

• Open House 5:30 p.m.

• Presentations 6:00 p.m.

• Public Comment 6:30 p.m.

• Next Steps and Adjourn 8:00 p.m.

June 6, 2024 (Thursday) 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Siuslaw Middle School – 2525 Oak St., Florence, OR 97439

June 7, 2024 (Friday) 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Newport High School – 322 NE Eads St., Newport, OR 97365

All ages and families are welcome to attend. Light refreshments will be provided.

Comments will be accepted through June 15, 2024.

Email or written comments: Please be sure to address the enforceable policies you believe are relevant in your comments. OCMP staff may review comments on proposed actions for alignment with enforceable policies and potential conditions to enhance consistency. For more information on the federal consistency review and how to comment, visit https://www.oregon.gov/lcd/OCMP/Pages/Offshore-Wind-Energy-Leasing.aspx

Online comments: Comments may be submitted online through a webform here: https://www.oregon.gov/lcd/OCMP/Pages/Federal-Consistency-Review.aspx

In-Person comments: Community members wishing to comment in person should plan to limit comments to three minutes per person. If many people wish to comment, staff may need to limit comment time further as we want to hear from as many community members as possible.

### About The Oregon Coastal Management Program Oregon is one of 34 states to have a nationally recognized Coastal Management Program established by the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972. The Oregon Coastal Management Program aims to protect coastal and ocean resources, and ensure livable, resilient communities on the Oregon coast. The Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development is the lead agency in the coastal program network, which also includes 11 state agencies and 42 city and county governments. Financial assistance for the Oregon Coastal Management Program is provided by the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended, administered by the Office for Coastal Management, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Oregon’s statewide land use planning program – Originated in 1973 under Senate Bill 100, Oregon’s land use program protects farm and forest lands, conserves natural resources, promotes livable communities, facilitates orderly and efficient development, supports coordination among local governments, and enables community engagement.

The Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) administers the program in partnership with cities and counties. The Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC), a seven-member volunteer board, guides DLCD.

The land use planning program affords Oregonians predictability in the development process and the ability to plan and invest in the long-range by allocating land for industrial, commercial, and housing development, as well as transportation, other urban services, and farm and forest lands.

Under the program, all cities and counties have adopted comprehensive plans that meet mandatory state standards. The standards are based on the 19 Statewide Planning Goals that deal with land use, development, housing, transportation, and conservation of natural resources. Technical assistance in the form of expertise and grants for local jurisdictions are key elements of the program. https://www.newsbreak.com/news/3459593684750-coastal-community-meetings-on-proposed-offshore-wind-leases-to-be-held

PacifiCorp To Pay $178M To Oregon Wildfire Victims In Latest Settlement Over Deadly 2020 Wildfires — The majority of the 403 plaintiffs in the settlement Monday were affected by the Echo Mountain Complex Fire that devastated Oregon’s central coast

Pacific Power, part of PacifiCorp, said Monday it has agreed to a $178M settlement with over 400 Oregon plaintiffs in the latest multimillion-dollar payout related to the deadly 2020 wildfires that ravaged the state.

In other cases that have gone to trial over the past year, Oregon juries in multiple verdicts have ordered PacifiCorp to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to victims. Ongoing litigation could leave it on the hook for billions.

The majority of the 403 plaintiffs in the settlement Monday were affected by the Echo Mountain Complex Fire that devastated Oregon’s central coast, said George McCoy, one of the plaintiffs’ attorneys, while others were impacted by the Santiam Fire that raged east of the state capital Salem in northwestern Oregon.

In a statement, the utility said it has settled nearly 1,500 claims stemming from the Labor Day 2020 wildfires. The blazes were among the worst natural disasters in Oregon’s history, killing nine people, burning more than 1,875 square miles (4,856 square kilometers) and destroying thousands of homes and other structures.

PacifiCorp faces more lawsuits over the blazes, including one filed last month by dozens of Oregon wineries and vineyards seeking over $100 million in damages. In their suit, the wine producers alleged that the utility’s decision to not turn off power during the Labor Day windstorm contributed to blazes whose smoke and soot damaged their grapes and reduced their harvest and sales.

Last June, a jury found PacifiCorp liable for negligently failing to cut power to its 600,000 customers despite warnings from top fire officials. The jury determined it acted negligently and willfully and should have to pay punitive and other damages — a decision that applied to a class including the owners of up to 2,500 properties.

Thousands of other class members are still awaiting trials, although the sides are also expected to engage in mediation that could lead to a settlement.

Last week, Oregon utility regulators rejected a request from PacifiCorp that sought to limit its liability in wildfire lawsuits.

Under the proposal, the utility would only have been responsible for paying out actual economic damages in lawsuit awards. The Oregon Public Utility Commission said the request was too broad, and that such a move would prohibit payouts for noneconomic damages such as pain, mental suffering and emotional distress.

Investigation Continues as DEQ and Other State and Federal Agencies Responding To Report of Mysterious Tar Patties and Oiled Birds Being Found On Oregon Coast

The U.S. Coast Guard, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the Washington Department of Ecology are working under a Joint Operations Center. They know the tar balls are petroleum based, but they don’t know the source. There have been no reports of spills from ships. Several birds are being treated for exposure to the oil. Three Common Murres were cleaned and released on the northern Washington Coast.

These sightings come aftermultiple birds covered in black oil were found washed up on the coast between Long Beach, Wash. and Lincoln City. They add the U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies are working to determine the source of the tar-like product, but it is unknown at this time.

Authorities are encouraging beachgoers not to handle any oil-covered wildlife or touch any tar patties found. However, they say to report any findings to 1-800-22-BIRDS (1-800-222-4737).

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), as well as federal agencies, are responding Thursday to the report of pieces of tar found on beaches along the Oregon Coast.

Tar balls, oiled birds found on Oregon and Washington coasts

Agencies received a report of pieces of tar in patties on Wednesday at Cannon Beach. The Coast Guard confirmed tar patties on Cannon Beach. The ODFW reported finding tar patties on Thursday near Lincoln City on the central Oregon Coast.

The agencies and partner agencies in Washington are forming a unified command to guide response in both states. The report at Cannon Beach and finding at Lincoln City comes after the discovery of multiple birds affected by a tar-like substance along the shoreline in northern Oregon and southern Washington, as well as tar balls in southern Washington.

We strongly advise the public not to handle any tar or oily product found or attempt to assist affected wildlife along the shore, but to report these findings to 1-800-22-BIRDS (1-800-222-4737).

Untrained handling of affected wildlife is dangerous to the animals and any individuals attempting to help. The U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies are working together to determine the source of the tar-like substance. The source is unknown.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife — Responders continue to survey beaches along the Oregon and Washington coasts for tar-like patties and impacted wildlife.

The substance has been determined to be petroleum-based. • Report oiled wildlife to 1-800-22-BIRDS. • Call 211 for questions not related to oiled wildlife.

• Please leave cleanup to professional responders who are trained and equipped to handle this type of material. Responders are actively working to clean up beaches.

• If you come into contact with the beach tar, wash the area with soap or degreasing dishwashing detergent and water. Avoid using solvents, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel or similar products.

For the latest updates please visit ordeq.org/beach-tar. This site will be updated regularly.

OSU and Two California Universities Will Research Potential Impacts of Offshore Wind Energy Projects

Three West Coast universities located near future offshore wind energy sites are joining forces to undertake research and to help inform the public about the benefits and potential impacts of the new industry.

An auction expected to take place later this year for two wind energy sites off the southern Oregon coast has stirred both excitement about the potential for clean energy development and concern from nearby residents, tribes and the seafood industry amid a push by the Biden administration for the development of offshore wind energy.

The federal government has a goal of producing 30 gigawatts of offshore wind energy by 2030 and has called for the development of university “centers of excellence” to help drive that development.

The new Pacific Offshore Wind Consortium is made up of three university research centers in Oregon and California. The goal is to combine resources and expertise to garner more funding and to undertake more collaborative information sharing and research with state and federal agencies, tribes and towns on the West Coast.

“We can be that sort of trusted neutral third party to try and tell them what the state of the industry is, and to help create capacity in the community so they can negotiate, discuss, communicate, with some of these wind developers,” said Bryson Robertson, director of Oregon State’s Pacific Marine Energy Center, one of the three university research centers participating.

The other two participating institutions are the northern California Schatz Energy Research Center at Cal Poly Humboldt in Arcata and the Center for Coastal Marine Sciences at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo. The two universities are the closest to five lease areas off the California coast that were auctioned off last year to international wind energy companies.

The two wind energy areas being auctioned off Oregon’s coast later this year are near Coos Bay and Brookings, and they could add up to 2.4 gigawatts of clean power to the grid – enough to power about 830,000 homes – with installations covering more than 195,000 acres in total. Each wind energy area identified is 20 to 30 miles offshore.

Seafood industry groups along with five Oregon and California tribes are opposed to the wind development plans off the coasts of both states. In November, the Tribal Council of the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians passed a resolution opposing offshore wind energy development, in part, they said, because federal officials had failed to engage them or respond to their concerns.

“There’s a lot of community-based concerns and questions out there, and there’s been a dearth of proper, data-driven knowledge and information dissemination to help people make decisions,” Robertson of Oregon State said.

“As Oregonians we should be looking at: How do we maximize the benefit of those lease sales if they’re going to happen? How do we make sure that they have stipulations that require union labor? Whether it has distinct community benefits written into it? There are a whole slew of opportunities where the state could apply or impose needs and requirements on a lease sale,” he said

The state is attempting to develop offshore wind energy standards via House Bill 4080, which was signed by Gov. Tina Kotek earlier this year. The law directs the Oregon Department of Energy to develop a roadmap for state policies on offshore wind energy development that include community input and labor guidelines. READ MORE: https://yachatsnews.com/osu-and-two-california-universities-will-research-potential-impacts-of-offshore-wind-energy-projects/

Urgent Health Warning Has Been Issued By The Oregon Health Authority: Do NOT Eat Mussels Harvested From Specific Areas of Oregon’s Coast

May be an image of text that says 'DANGER ΟΧΙΣ MUSSELS DO NOT EAT The sport harvest of mussels is CLOSED from Seal Rock to the Washington border for high levels of paralytic shellfish toxin. PublicHealth Public Health Prevent.Pro Prevent.Promote, Prevent.Promote.Protect. Preven -Promote, Proteet, LincolnCounty Lincoln County'

At least 20 individuals have fallen ill due to a dangerous biotoxin found in mussels harvested in Oregon. Symptoms of poisoning include numbness, nausea, vomiting, weakness, and, in severe cases, difficulty breathing or irregular heartbeat.

What You Need to Know: 👉Affected Areas: Mussels harvested since May 15, 2024, from beaches between Seal Rock State Park and the Washington border should be discarded immediately. 👉Symptoms: If you or anyone you know experiences symptoms after eating mussels, seek medical attention promptly. 👉Preventive Measures: Avoid consuming shellfish from beaches with biotoxin closures.

📞 If you have concerns or need advice, contact the Oregon Poison Center at 800-222-1222. Your safety is our top priority! For more information, visit: Oregon Department of Agriculture Recreational Shellfish Biotoxin Closure: https://www.oregon.gov/…/Pages/ShellfishClosures.aspx…Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Shellfish and Biotoxins: https://myodfw.com/articles/shellfish-and-biotoxins…Oregon Health Authority Fish and Shellfish Consumption Resources: https://www.oregon.gov/…/pages/seafood-shellfish.aspx…

OHA asking people who harvested, ate any Oregon Coast shellfish to complete survey

PORTLAND, Ore.—State health officials are asking people who recently harvested or ate any shellfish from the Oregon Coast to complete a survey as part of an investigation of illnesses linked to shellfish biotoxins.

On May 28, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) urged people to throw out mussels gathered from beaches between Seal Rock State Park north to the Washington border after cases of paralytic shellfish poisoning were reported to the agency. The shellfish were harvested at beaches in Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsop counties.

OHA is now asking people who harvested or ate Oregon shellfish since May 13 to take a short survey to help investigators identify a possible cause of the outbreak and how many people became sick. Responses are secure and confidential, and will help OHA Public Health Division investigators learn more about the sources and size of this outbreak.

Those who already completed an interview with their local public health agency do not need to complete the survey.

Contact Rosalie Trevejo (osalie.trevejo2@oha.oregon.gov“>rosalie.trevejo2@oha.oregon.gov) or June Bancroft (ancroft@oha.oregon.gov“>june.e.bancroft@oha.oregon.gov) of OHA’s Public Health Division with any questions or concerns about the survey.

On May 23, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) closed a stretch of Oregon Coast to mussel harvesting from Seal Rock State Park north to Cape Lookout due to high levels of PSP. The mussel harvest closure was extended from Seal Rock State Park north to the Washington border on May 26.

People who experience any symptoms of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) – numbness of the mouth and lips, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, and in severe cases, shortness of breath or irregular heartbeat – should immediately contact a health care provider. They can also get advice by calling the Oregon Poison Center at 800-222-1222.

PSP is a foodborne illness caused by saxitoxins produced by marine algae and caused by eating shellfish contaminated with the naturally occurring biotoxin, including scallops, mussels, clams, oysters and cockles, as well as some fish and crabs, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). There is no antidote for PSP – treatment involves supportive care and, if necessary, respiratory support.

For additional information:

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife — Responders continue to survey beaches along the Oregon and Washington coasts for tar-like patties and impacted wildlife.

The substance has been determined to be petroleum-based. • Report oiled wildlife to 1-800-22-BIRDS. • Call 211 for questions not related to oiled wildlife.

• Please leave cleanup to professional responders who are trained and equipped to handle this type of material. Responders are actively working to clean up beaches.

• If you come into contact with the beach tar, wash the area with soap or degreasing dishwashing detergent and water. Avoid using solvents, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel or similar products.

For the latest updates please visit ordeq.org/beach-tar. This site will be updated regularly.

DEQ and Other State and Federal Agencies Responding To Report of Mysterious Tar Patties and Oiled Birds Being Found On Oregon Coast

The investigation continues into what’s causing balls of tar to wash up on Oregon and Washington beaches.

The U.S. Coast Guard, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the Washington Department of Ecology are working under a Joint Operations Center. They know the tar balls are petroleum based, but they don’t know the source. There have been no reports of spills from ships. Several birds are being treated for exposure to the oil. Three Common Murres were cleaned and released on the northern Washington Coast.

These sightings come aftermultiple birds covered in black oil were found washed up on the coast between Long Beach, Wash. and Lincoln City. They add the U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies are working to determine the source of the tar-like product, but it is unknown at this time.

Authorities are encouraging beachgoers not to handle any oil-covered wildlife or touch any tar patties found. However, they say to report any findings to 1-800-22-BIRDS (1-800-222-4737).

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), as well as federal agencies, are responding Thursday to the report of pieces of tar found on beaches along the Oregon Coast.

Tar balls, oiled birds found on Oregon and Washington coasts

Agencies received a report of pieces of tar in patties on Wednesday at Cannon Beach. The Coast Guard confirmed tar patties on Cannon Beach. The ODFW reported finding tar patties on Thursday near Lincoln City on the central Oregon Coast.

The agencies and partner agencies in Washington are forming a unified command to guide response in both states. The report at Cannon Beach and finding at Lincoln City comes after the discovery of multiple birds affected by a tar-like substance along the shoreline in northern Oregon and southern Washington, as well as tar balls in southern Washington.

We strongly advise the public not to handle any tar or oily product found or attempt to assist affected wildlife along the shore, but to report these findings to 1-800-22-BIRDS (1-800-222-4737).

Untrained handling of affected wildlife is dangerous to the animals and any individuals attempting to help. The U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies are working together to determine the source of the tar-like substance. The source is unknown.

The City of Newport Parks and Recreation   · Jump into some summer fun with Fun Fridays at the Aquatic Center!

May be an image of text that says 'NEWPORT AQUATIC CENTER FUN FRIDAYS JUN SPLASH INTO SUMMER NIERNESDIVERTIDOS! VIERNESE 14 5:00-7:00 PM POOL PARTY FIESTA DE LA PISCINA SHARK WEEK AT THE POOL SUN SEMANA DEL TIBURÓN EN LA PISCINA 21 JUN 28 ICE CREAM SOCIAL SOCIAL DE HELADOS AQUA LUAU JUL LUAU ACUÁTICO 05 JUL WACKY WATER GAMES 12 JUEGOS DE AGUA LOCOS DIVE-IN MOVIE JUL CИΝΕ EN LA PISCINA 19 26 GROOVE 'N SPLASH MOVER CHAPOTEAR BACK TO SCHOOL AUG POOLPARTY PARTY POOL FIESTAD ADE DE LA LAPISCIN ISCINADE REGRESOA FESTADELAPESCINADERECRESACLASES ACLASES 02 $6 RESIDENTS (RESIDENTES) $7 NON-RESIDENTS (NO RESIDENTES)'

Every Friday from 5:00-7:00 pm starting June 14-August 2, we’ll be having a different event with treats, swimming, and a whole lot of fun 💦🎉💦 Splash Into Summer Pool Party – June 14🦈 Shark Week at the Pool – June 21🍨 Ice Cream Social – June 28🌺 Aqua Luau – July 5🏐 Wacky Water Games – July 12🎬 Dive-In Movie – July 19🎶 Groove ‘N Splash – July 26🎉 Back to School Pool Party – August 2To register, or for more information, visit: https://secure.rec1.com/OR/newport-or/catalog/index/3301ee005323360a4b94841fb832a9b0?filter=c2VhcmNoPWZ1biUyMGZyaWRheXM=

¡Salta a la diversión del verano con los Viernes Divertidos en el Centro Acuático! Todos los viernes de 5:00 a 7:00 pm, del 14 de junio al 2 de agosto, tendremos un evento diferente con golosinas, natación y mucha diversión 💦🎉💦 Fiesta de la Piscina – June 14🦈 Semana del Tiburón en la Piscina – June 21🍨 Social de Helados – June 28🌺 Luau Acuático – July 5🏐 Juegos de Agua Locos – July 12🎬 Cine en la Piscina – July 19🎶 Mover y Chapotear – July 26🎉 Fiesta de Piscina de Regreso a Clases – August 2Para inscribirse o para más información, visite: https://secure.rec1.com/OR/newport-or/catalog/index/3301ee005323360a4b94841fb832a9b0?filter=c2VhcmNoPWZ1biUyMGZyaWRheXM=

OHA Kicks off 2024 Oregon Beach Monitoring Season

Agency shares list of monitored beaches for May-September

—The Oregon Beach Monitoring Program (OBMP) is kicking off the 2024 beach monitoring season by announcing the list of coastal recreation areas it will be keeping an eye on for bacteria during summer and early fall.

The 24 beaches on the list that the OBMP, based at the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Public Health Division, is publishing includes some of the most frequently visited beaches in Oregon. It also includes beaches where the program has found bacteria present, or beaches for which local partners and the public have requested monitoring due to potential pollution concerns.

The following are Oregon beaches being monitored during 2024, including beach name, and the city and county in which they are located:

Beach monitoring season runs from mid-May to mid-September. Beach advisories are only issued for beaches that are actively being monitored within this sampling window. Other beaches will be investigated for inclusion in the next beach monitoring season.

OBMP works with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to identify beaches that need monitoring based on several established criteria. These criteria include: pollution hazards present; previous beach monitoring data that identify water quality concerns; type and amount of beach use; and public input.

As part of an adaptive sampling plan, beaches and sampling locations are routinely re-evaluated to ensure available resources best protect public health. A copy of DEQ’s beach evaluation is available upon request.

For more information and current beach monitoring conditions please visit: www.healthoregon.org/beach, or contact OBMP at each.Health@odhsoha.oregon.gov“>Beach.Health@odhsoha.oregon.gov or 971-673-0400.

Free Household Hazardous Waste Roundup in Florence on Friday, June 7, and Saturday, June 8

The free Household Hazardous Waste Roundup will collect up to 35 gallons of household hazardous waste per customer on Friday, June 7, and Saturday, June 8, in Florence. Hazardous waste from businesses, schools, churches, government agencies or non-profits may be subject to disposal fees and those organizations must pre-register for the event.

When:  Friday, June 7, 12:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. and Saturday, June 8, 8:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

Where: Florence Transfer Site (2820 N. Rhododendron Drive)

Who: All community members are welcome to participate in the roundup. 

What to bring:

Up to 35 gallons of paint, household cleaners, lawn and garden chemicals, car care products, arts and crafts products, pool chemicals, fluorescent lamps and other household hazardous waste. Check labels for words like flammable, corrosive, poison, caution, and danger.

Please don’t bring: 

Empty containers, drums, radioactive or infectious waste, asbestos, pressurized cylinders, or explosives. Any empty containers can be safely thrown in the trash. For information about disposal of radioactive waste, asbestos or explosives call 541-682-3828.

What about hazardous waste from businesses?

Businesses that generate small amounts of hazardous waste may pre-register to bring that waste to this event. Businesses must pay for disposal of the waste, but most can save money by using this program rather than hiring a contractor. 

Electronics Recycling

The Cottage Grove, Creswell, Florence, Marcola, Oakridge, Rattlesnake, Veneta and Vida transfer stations accept the following items for free during normal operating hours: televisions, computer monitors, CPUs, printers, phones and laptops.  Maximum seven items per day. No commercial or floor-standing copiers, parts or dismantled units. 

Please call 541 682-4120 for more information about hazardous waste disposal for households or businesses.

Douglas County authorities report that they have issued a warrant for the suspect in last month’s destruction of 18,000 juvenile salmon at the Reedsport hatchery. 

20-year-old Joshua Alexander Heckathorn of Gardiner did not show up at court on Monday. He had been scheduled for his first court appearance on May 16th, but told officials he had transportation issues and couldn’t make it.

But with his failure to make his rescheduled appearance, Douglas County Circuit Court Judge Jason Thomas issued a bench warrant for Heckathorn. 

The warrant allows law enforcement to detain Heckathorn and bring him in on $10,000 bail.

Heckathorn is accused of breaking into the Reedsport hatchery and pouring bleach into a tank with thousands of young Chinook salmon. He’s charged with burglary, criminal trespass, and criminal mischief. 

Lincoln County Announces Low Income Program To Help Spay And Neuter Pets

Lincoln County has announced it will use some of its federal relief funds for a spay and neuter service to help counter dog and cat overpopulation that was substantially worsened by the Covid-19 pandemic.

The program is for local low-income households that cannot afford spay and neuter services for their pets. County staff will work with applicants and participating veterinarians’ offices to coordinate and submit payment for the procedures.

To qualify, people must be a resident of Lincoln County and income eligible, which can be confirmed by showing eligibility for SNAP/TANF; WIC; OHP; Medicaid; housing assistance; supplemental social security income; veterans pension benefits; and surviving spouse pension benefits.

The applications are online. For the English version go here; for the Spanish version, go here.

For assistance filling out the application, call the helpline at 541-270-3393. Friends of the Lincoln County Animal Shelter has volunteered to help answer questions on the helpline and assist applicants who do not have access to computers.

“Our county fell woefully behind in spaying and neutering during the pandemic, when many vets had to suspend elective surgeries altogether, and after the fires of fall 2020, which meant financial hardship for many residents,” said FOLCAS president Emily DeHuff. “These subsidies will go a long way in getting spay/neuter rates back on track.”

People who do not meet the income qualification for the county program can apply for spay/neuter and other veterinary care assistance through other programs administered by the humane society by visiting www.centralcoasthumanesociety.com and completing a request for assistance form. (SOURCE)

EVCNB

Emergency Volunteer Corps of Nehalem Bay

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State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council Will Meet on June 11th

Salem, Ore. – The State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council will meet at 2:00 p.m. on Tuesday, June 11, 2024. The meeting will take place remotely via the internet on Microsoft Teams and is open to the public. The agenda and handouts will be posted on the council’s website.

  • What: Meeting of the State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council
  • When: Tuesday, June 11, 2024, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
  • Where: Microsoft Teams | Join Meeting
  • Meeting ID: 216 565 392 995 Passcode: ekgWVp
  • Phone: +1 503-446-4951 Phone conference ID: 944 308 59#
  • Who: State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council

The State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council was established by Governor Kotek’s Executive Order 23-26, Establishing a State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council.

The purpose of the Council is to recommend an action plan to guide awareness education, and usage of artificial intelligence in state government that aligns with the State’s policies, goals, and values and supports public servants to deliver customer service more efficiently and effectively. The recommended action plan shall include concrete executive actions, policies, and investments needed to leverage artificial intelligence while honoring transparency, privacy, and diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Meetings of the State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council are open to the public.

Public comment may be made during the meeting. Sign-up for public comment is required as spots are limited. Sign-up closes Monday, June 9 at noon. Written comment will also be accepted. Written comment can be submitted by mail to the Council Support Office, 550 Airport Rd SE Suite C, Salem, OR 97301 or online via the office form.

Accommodations can be arranged for persons with disabilities, and alternate formats of printed material are available upon request. Please contact Enterprise Information Services at 503-378-3175 at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting to request accommodations. Closed captioning is included on the Microsoft Teams meeting.

Links:

Oregonians Targeted By Text Tolling Scam

A new nationwide texting scam is targeting Oregon drivers now. Ellen Klem, with the Oregon Attorney General’s Office says the phishing scheme started in the midwest earlier in the spring. “I’m honestly not surprised it’s happening now, because now is the time where everyone is gearing up to drive.”

The text claims to be from “Oregon Toll Service” and says the recipient owes an $11.69 outstanding balance; they face a $50 late fee if they don’t click on a link and pay up. Klem says some people may identify the fraud right away, because Oregon doesn’t have tolling, “But, we live next to all these other states that have tolls.” And she worries some will fall for it.

“They are not interested in the $11,” says Klem, “They are interested in much, much more.” She believes the scammers want your personal information, and clicking on the link could allow them to access other data on your phone.

The text has all the markers of a scam, like contact out of the blue from an unknown agency. “There’s a lot of really cheap or free technology out there that allows the scammers to pretend to be somebody they’re not. So, in this case, they’re pretending to be associated with an agency that administers tolls in the state of Oregon. But that doesn’t exist,” says Klem, “Second sign: There’s some sort of emergency. In this case, you have an unpaid bill; that’s frightening to a lot of people.”

She suggests not being in such a rush to respond to every text or email, “These phones, they’re everywhere and we have this sort of automatic response to click on a link or to pick up every phone call. And, I want to remind people just to slow down and think before you click on anything.” Klem adds, “Really, at the end of the day, this is a text message that you can and you should ignore.”

If you get a text, email or phone call you’re not sure is legit, call the Oregon Department of Justice Consumer hotline at 877-877-9392. Volunteer experts are available weekdays between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

New Report Finds Road Rage Shootings Have Increased In Oregon Over The Past Decade But Are Still Well Below The National Average

Nationally, road rage shooting incidents skyrocketed over the past decade, from 83 in 2014 to 456 in 2023 — a nearly 450% jump, according to an analysis of Gun Violence Archive data by The Trace.

  • Road rage shootings in Oregon went from zero in 2014 to 0.7 people per 1 million in 2023: the national average is 1.4.

The country’s road rage hot spots were New Mexico, with 2.65 shooting incidents per 1 million people, followed by Wisconsin (1.94) and Tennessee (1.91).

Oregon has experienced some high-profile road rage shootings in recent years.

In March, Geoffrey Edward Hammond pleaded not guilty to charges of fatally shooting Ryan Martin, 47, after arguing about parking in front of the Moxy Hotel.

  • Prosecutors accuse Hammond of also wounding a passing architect, Samuel Gomez, whose photo of being pointed at with a gun later won an award. Hammond pleaded not guilty to that too.

In May, a 25-year-old man pleaded guilty except for insanity to second-degree murder for killing a Tigard man two years ago after a dispute on Highway 18.

  • The slain driver’s partner said their wiper fluid may have splashed a BMW driving behind them, starting a chain of events that led to the shooting.

Caveat: The Gun Violence Archive is a private nonprofit that produces a range of estimates based on police reports, government data, news stories and more. Some incidents go unreported, so the data is likely an undercount. (SOURCE)

An Oregon man and his four dogs were rescued earlier this week after his vehicle plunged off an embankment and into a creek in Baker County – with one of the dogs traveling nearly four miles to alert humans for help.

Baker County Sheriff’s Office —  · Press Release: Halfway Man Rescued After Car Crash Leaves Him Stranded Overnight

On June 3, 2024 at approximately 9:28 a.m., Baker County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch received a report of a vehicle over an embankment on U.S. Forest Service Road 39. The reporting party explained that his brother, Brandon Garrett, had not made it to his camp yesterday afternoon. Family members located his vehicle this morning but were unable to reach it due to the terrain.

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Baker County Sheriff’s Office, Baker County Search and Rescue, Pine Valley Rural Fire District and Halfway Ambulance responded to the scene. Sheriff Ash arrived and located the vehicle, along with a dog, in the steep, brushy ravine. As he was looking for an access point to the creek, he heard a subject yell for help. Brandon Garrett, operator of the vehicle, was located alive approximately one hundred yards from the vehicle above the creek. Sheriff Ash rendered first aid. Pine Valley Rural Fire volunteers and U.S. Forest Service employees used chainsaws to clear a path for Search and Rescue.

Members of the Baker County Search and Rescue Ropes Team set up their rescue equipment and began the difficult task of reaching Garrett. Once the team was able to reach him, they loaded and secured him in a rescue basket. He was connected to a highline rope system and pulled across the ravine, where he was transferred to a group of SAR members and medical personnel.

Garrett was transported by Halfway Ambulance to the Life Flight helicopter, where he was airlifted to a regional hospital. During the investigation, it was determined that Garrett was traveling north on U.S. Forest Service Road 39 on June 2nd with his four dogs, when he failed to negotiate a curve causing the vehicle to plummet off the embankment. One of his dogs traveled the nearly four miles to their camp, which alerted the rest of the party that something was wrong. Garrett was able to crawl approximately one hundred yards from the vehicle, where he spent the night. The rest of the party continued to search for him, and family members located his vehicle on the morning of June 3rd. The three remaining dogs were located alive at the crash scene.

Baker County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank Baker County Search and Rescue, Pine Valley Rural Fire District, Halfway Ambulance, Life Flight and the U.S. Forest Service for their assistance during this rescue.

Oregon has the highest rate of animal vehicle collisions on the West Coast.

The Oregon Zoo and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife have developed a project to identify the deadliest roads. The iNaturalist Roadkills of Oregon project asks you to take photos of animals killed by cars.

The picture will be uploaded into an app, so biologists will be able to track areas where the most collisions occur. Currently, only large animals like deer and elk are tracked. This project will monitor all animals that are killed.

Roadways and vehicular traffic are a significant contributor to fragmentation of habitat and impacts to wildlife, including injury and mortality. The purpose of this project is to improve our understanding of the impacts of roads on Oregon’s wildlife, and to identify roadkill hot spots and vulnerabilities among a diversity of animals, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates. This information can help reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions and make roadways safer. Please go to: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/roadkills-of-oregon/journal

SUMMER ALERT: Blood and platelet donors needed now — American Red Cross – Cascades Region

Red Cross provides support to communities devastated by recent storms

— The American Red Cross critically needs blood and platelet donors now following a concerning decrease in donations as the country has experienced an increase in severe weather systems and historic travel.In fact, over the past month about 20,000 fewer blood donations were collected than needed to maintain the Red Cross-national blood supply.

According to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), five of the busiest travel days ever happened this month and more record-breaking travel is expected this summer — a busy time when many regular donors may be unable to give. Additionally, as the U.S. approaches what AAA calls the “100 deadliest days” of summer for auto accidents, it is critical hospitals have lifesaving blood products on hand for all trauma and accident victims who count on transfusions when there is no time to waste. In some of the most-dire situations, medical teams may need to use hundreds of blood products to save a life.

“Emergencies take many forms – some arising in a hospital and others arising as relentless and devastating storms,” said Priscilla Fuentes, regional executive of the Red Cross Cascades Region. “Unfortunately, our community has been no stranger to emergencies these past few years, but when I witness communities come together – at a blood drive or after a disaster – I see us growing stronger and becoming more resilient. Together, we can provide help and hope that is very much needed right now.”

Storm response efforts: The holiday weekend brought the busiest severe weather day of the year so far, with 26 reported tornadoes across 10 states.

With the most active year for tornadoes since 2017, hundreds of Red Cross disaster workers, including more than 20 from our region, are working around the clock with partners across multiple states to make sure people affected by this severe weather have a safe place to stay, food, relief supplies and emotional and spiritual support. Emergency shelters are open in some of the hardest hit areas. Red Cross disaster workers are helping assess the damage where it is safe to do so with preliminary reports indicating nearly 3,000 homes either destroyed or with major damage across the country.

The Red Cross is monitoring the weather and standing by to open additional shelters if needed. Should new communities be impacted, the organization will be on the ground providing help in the days and weeks to come.

How to help: Individuals are urged to help those facing emergencies – whether they need a lifesaving blood transfusion or shelter from the storm.

  • Make a blood donation appointment by downloading the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting RedCrossBlood.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years old and younger must meet certain height and weight requirements.
  • Featured blood drive: Saturday, June 8, Portland Chapter Building 3131 N. Vancouver Ave. Go to RedCrossBlood.org for times or other dates and locations.
  • Help people affected by disasters like flooding and countless other crises by making a financial donation to Red Cross Disaster Relief today at redcross.org or via 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Your gift enables the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters big and small.
  • Put on a red vest and join us as a volunteer today to provide relief and hope when it matters most. Visit redcross.org/volunteertoday to sign up for local opportunities, like our Disaster Action Team, or Bood Donor Ambassador Program.

The Red Cross has teamed up with Tetris, creators of the iconic, best-selling video game, to celebrate their 40th anniversary and build the blood supply for patients in need. In commemoration, all who answer the call to help May 20-June 9, 2024, will get an exclusive Tetris® + Red Cross T-shirt, while supplies last, plus be automatically entered for a chance to win a trip for two to New York to meet Tetris creator, Alexey Pajitnov. See RedCrossBlood.org/Tetris for details.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross provides shelter, food and comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or follow us on social media.

Come to the World Beat Festival to Experience Global Cultures: Ukraine is the 2024 Featured Country

Salem Multicultural Institute is excited to celebrate Ukraine as the 27th annual World Beat Festival’s featured country. World Beat is one of Salem’s premier community traditions, offering a vibrant two-day program of international music, dance, song, theater, food, crafts, customs, rituals, and folklore. This year’s festival will begin Friday evening, June 28, and run through Sunday, June 30, at Salem’s Riverfront Park.

Kathleen Fish, Executive Director, emphasizes that this is the only festival of its kind honoring the Salem/Keizer community’s rich tapestry of cultures. “There are 107 languages spoken in our school district. The festival recognizes and explores the cultures of many of these families.”

The festivities kick off Friday, June 28, from 5 to 10 p.m. with “Friday Night at the Beat,” featuring vocal performances and fire dancing on the Main Stage.

The festival opens at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 29, with the Children’s Parade. Kids who want to participate in the parade will assemble at the Pavilion at the North End of the park.

Each child who attends will receive a passport at the entrance gate to collect stamps from each World Village. Village tents will feature kid-friendly cultural games and activities. This year’s activities include making cherry blossoms in the Asian Pacific Village, Pysanky (traditional egg decorating) in the European Village, Arpilleras (traditional Chilean textile art) in the Americas Village, and crafting Nguni Shields in the Africa & Middle East Village.

Adults can enjoy beverages in the beer garden while listening to live music. Boating enthusiasts can cheer on their favorite teams during the World Beat Dragon Boat Races.

“We had over 25,000 guests attend last year, enjoying performances on seven stages representing more than 50 different countries and cultures. Our visitors come from all over the Northwest and even Canada,” added Fish.

Organized by the volunteer-driven Salem Multicultural Institute, the festival requires 400 volunteers annually to manage setup, stage operations, and cleanup. Volunteers contributing at least four hours receive an event T-shirt and free entry to the festival.

Admission to the festival is $10/1-day pass/adult or $15 for the weekend. Children 0-14, SNAP card holders, and Veterans are free.

You can view a complete schedule and vendor list or sign up to volunteer atwww.worldbeatfestival.org or call (503) 581-2004.

About the World Beat Festival: The World Beat Festival originated in the late 1990s and was conceived by two young mothers, Mona Hayes and Kathleen Fish, who wanted a space to celebrate cultural heritage. Starting with a small gathering in 1998, the festival has grown into Oregon’s largest multicultural event of its kind. www.WorldBeatFestival.org, 503-581-2004.

About the Salem Multicultural Institute (SMI): The vision of the Salem Multicultural Institute and the purpose of the World Beat Festival and World Beat Gallery are to create an environment of openness for all people. In all our activities, SMI aims to be family-friendly, economically inclusive, and culturally authentic. Visit the gallery located at 390 Liberty ST SE, Salem. www.salemmulticultural.org.

 

 

83-year-old Clarence Edward Pitts walked away from his home in Bandon on Tuesday, January 31 at around 1:00 p.m. Pitts is described as:

  • 6′ 00″
  • 150 lbs
  • Gray hair
  • Brown eyes
  • Last seen wearing an orange beanie, plaid jacket, tan pants and white shoes
  • May have a walking cane
  • Has dementia and PTSD

Pitts may be in a vehicle that was also found to be missing from the home:

  • 1999 Toyota Van
  • White
  • Oregon license plate: WYN 788

If you see Clarence or have any information pertaining to where he may be, please call the Coos County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch Center at 541-396-2106 or the Bandon Police Department at 541-347-3189.

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