Oregon Beach News, Monday 6/3 – Coastal Community Meetings on Proposed Offshore Wind Leases Will Be Held This Week in Brookings, Coos Bay, Florence and Newport & Other Local and Statewide News…

The latest news stories across the state of Oregon from the digital home of the Oregon coastal cities, OregonBeachMagazine.com

Monday, June 3, 2024

Oregon Beach Weather

SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY ISSUED – NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

...SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 11 PM PDT TUESDAY...

* WHAT...For the Small Craft Advisory, southwest winds 20 to 30 kt with gusts up to 40 kt and seas 7 to 10 ft at 11 seconds expected.

* WHERE...All areas.

* WHEN...For the Small Craft Advisory, until 11 PM PDT Tuesday. 
For the Hazardous Seas Warning, until 8 PM PDT this evening.

* IMPACTS...Very steep and hazardous seas could capsize or damage vessels. Bar crossings will become especially treacherous.

* View the hazard area in detail at https://go.usa.gov/x6hks

Coastal Community Meetings on Proposed Offshore Wind Leases Will Be Held This Week

The Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) will be hosting a series of community meetings along the Oregon coast related to a proposal by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) to lease areas of the ocean off Oregon’s coast to explore possibilities for wind energy development.

The proposed BOEM leases would authorize companies to study the areas off Oregon’s coast for potential offshore wind energy development projects. After obtaining leases, companies would perform activities in the ocean that may include placement of scientific buoys and collection of data about seafloor conditions, ocean habitats, and wildlife.

More information on the proposed leasing actions can be found at https://www.oregon.gov/lcd/OCMP/Pages/Offshore-Wind-Energy-Leasing.aspx.

BOEM’s proposed leasing action is not a proposal to permit the construction of an offshore wind project. A BOEM decision whether to approve a Construction and Operations Plan for a wind energy facility would be subject to a separate federal consistency review by the state, after some years of additional site assessment and project design.

As part of the state’s federal consistency review authority under the Coastal Zone Management Act, DLCD’s Oregon Coastal Management Program (OCMP) staff will review the proposed BOEM actions for consistency with current, enforceable Oregon coastal zone policies. The result of this review would be either to agree with BOEM’s proposed leasing actions, agree with conditions, or object to BOEM’s proposed actions. Enforceable policies in the coastal zone are existing state and local policies that have been approved by the NOAA Office for Coastal Management for use in federal consistency reviews, consistent with national Coastal Zone Management standards.

During the community meetings, OCMP staff will provide information about the proposed activities that are being reviewed and the applicable state policies and

authorities related to a consistency review. Community members are encouraged to provide comments on the consistency review during the 45-day comment period, which ends on June 15, 2024.

The community meetings will be an opportunity to provide comments in person which will be recorded by OCMP staff. The meeting program is as follows:

• Open House 5:30 p.m.

• Presentations 6:00 p.m.

• Public Comment 6:30 p.m.

• Next Steps and Adjourn 8:00 p.m.

June 3, 2024 (Monday) 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Brookings-Harbor High School – 8293, 625 Pioneer Rd., Brookings, OR 97415

June 4, 2024 (Tuesday) 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Sunset Middle School – 245 S Cammann St., Coos Bay, OR 97420

June 6, 2024 (Thursday) 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Siuslaw Middle School – 2525 Oak St., Florence, OR 97439

June 7, 2024 (Friday) 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Newport High School – 322 NE Eads St., Newport, OR 97365

All ages and families are welcome to attend. Light refreshments will be provided.

Comments will be accepted through June 15, 2024.

Email or written comments: Please be sure to address the enforceable policies you believe are relevant in your comments. OCMP staff may review comments on proposed actions for alignment with enforceable policies and potential conditions to enhance consistency. For more information on the federal consistency review and how to comment, visit https://www.oregon.gov/lcd/OCMP/Pages/Offshore-Wind-Energy-Leasing.aspx

Online comments: Comments may be submitted online through a webform here: https://www.oregon.gov/lcd/OCMP/Pages/Federal-Consistency-Review.aspx

In-Person comments: Community members wishing to comment in person should plan to limit comments to three minutes per person. If many people wish to comment, staff may need to limit comment time further as we want to hear from as many community members as possible.

### About The Oregon Coastal Management Program Oregon is one of 34 states to have a nationally recognized Coastal Management Program established by the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972. The Oregon Coastal Management Program aims to protect coastal and ocean resources, and ensure livable, resilient communities on the Oregon coast. The Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development is the lead agency in the coastal program network, which also includes 11 state agencies and 42 city and county governments. Financial assistance for the Oregon Coastal Management Program is provided by the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended, administered by the Office for Coastal Management, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Oregon’s statewide land use planning program – Originated in 1973 under Senate Bill 100, Oregon’s land use program protects farm and forest lands, conserves natural resources, promotes livable communities, facilitates orderly and efficient development, supports coordination among local governments, and enables community engagement.

The Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) administers the program in partnership with cities and counties. The Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC), a seven-member volunteer board, guides DLCD.

The land use planning program affords Oregonians predictability in the development process and the ability to plan and invest in the long-range by allocating land for industrial, commercial, and housing development, as well as transportation, other urban services, and farm and forest lands.

Under the program, all cities and counties have adopted comprehensive plans that meet mandatory state standards. The standards are based on the 19 Statewide Planning Goals that deal with land use, development, housing, transportation, and conservation of natural resources. Technical assistance in the form of expertise and grants for local jurisdictions are key elements of the program. https://www.newsbreak.com/news/3459593684750-coastal-community-meetings-on-proposed-offshore-wind-leases-to-be-held

OSU and Two California Universities Will Research Potential Impacts of Offshore Wind Energy Projects

Three West Coast universities located near future offshore wind energy sites are joining forces to undertake research and to help inform the public about the benefits and potential impacts of the new industry.

An auction expected to take place later this year for two wind energy sites off the southern Oregon coast has stirred both excitement about the potential for clean energy development and concern from nearby residents, tribes and the seafood industry amid a push by the Biden administration for the development of offshore wind energy.

The federal government has a goal of producing 30 gigawatts of offshore wind energy by 2030 and has called for the development of university “centers of excellence” to help drive that development.

The new Pacific Offshore Wind Consortium is made up of three university research centers in Oregon and California. The goal is to combine resources and expertise to garner more funding and to undertake more collaborative information sharing and research with state and federal agencies, tribes and towns on the West Coast.

“We can be that sort of trusted neutral third party to try and tell them what the state of the industry is, and to help create capacity in the community so they can negotiate, discuss, communicate, with some of these wind developers,” said Bryson Robertson, director of Oregon State’s Pacific Marine Energy Center, one of the three university research centers participating.

The other two participating institutions are the northern California Schatz Energy Research Center at Cal Poly Humboldt in Arcata and the Center for Coastal Marine Sciences at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo. The two universities are the closest to five lease areas off the California coast that were auctioned off last year to international wind energy companies.

The two wind energy areas being auctioned off Oregon’s coast later this year are near Coos Bay and Brookings, and they could add up to 2.4 gigawatts of clean power to the grid – enough to power about 830,000 homes – with installations covering more than 195,000 acres in total. Each wind energy area identified is 20 to 30 miles offshore.

Seafood industry groups along with five Oregon and California tribes are opposed to the wind development plans off the coasts of both states. In November, the Tribal Council of the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians passed a resolution opposing offshore wind energy development, in part, they said, because federal officials had failed to engage them or respond to their concerns.

“There’s a lot of community-based concerns and questions out there, and there’s been a dearth of proper, data-driven knowledge and information dissemination to help people make decisions,” Robertson of Oregon State said.

“As Oregonians we should be looking at: How do we maximize the benefit of those lease sales if they’re going to happen? How do we make sure that they have stipulations that require union labor? Whether it has distinct community benefits written into it? There are a whole slew of opportunities where the state could apply or impose needs and requirements on a lease sale,” he said

The state is attempting to develop offshore wind energy standards via House Bill 4080, which was signed by Gov. Tina Kotek earlier this year. The law directs the Oregon Department of Energy to develop a roadmap for state policies on offshore wind energy development that include community input and labor guidelines. READ MORE: https://yachatsnews.com/osu-and-two-california-universities-will-research-potential-impacts-of-offshore-wind-energy-projects/

Urgent Health Warning Has Been Issued By The Oregon Health Authority: Do NOT Eat Mussels Harvested From Specific Areas of Oregon’s Coast

May be an image of text that says 'DANGER ΟΧΙΣ MUSSELS DO NOT EAT The sport harvest of mussels is CLOSED from Seal Rock to the Washington border for high levels of paralytic shellfish toxin. PublicHealth Public Health Prevent.Pro Prevent.Promote, Prevent.Promote.Protect. Preven -Promote, Proteet, LincolnCounty Lincoln County'

At least 20 individuals have fallen ill due to a dangerous biotoxin found in mussels harvested in Oregon. Symptoms of poisoning include numbness, nausea, vomiting, weakness, and, in severe cases, difficulty breathing or irregular heartbeat.

What You Need to Know: 👉Affected Areas: Mussels harvested since May 15, 2024, from beaches between Seal Rock State Park and the Washington border should be discarded immediately. 👉Symptoms: If you or anyone you know experiences symptoms after eating mussels, seek medical attention promptly. 👉Preventive Measures: Avoid consuming shellfish from beaches with biotoxin closures.

📞 If you have concerns or need advice, contact the Oregon Poison Center at 800-222-1222. Your safety is our top priority! For more information, visit: Oregon Department of Agriculture Recreational Shellfish Biotoxin Closure: https://www.oregon.gov/…/Pages/ShellfishClosures.aspx…Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Shellfish and Biotoxins: https://myodfw.com/articles/shellfish-and-biotoxins…Oregon Health Authority Fish and Shellfish Consumption Resources: https://www.oregon.gov/…/pages/seafood-shellfish.aspx…

OHA asking people who harvested, ate any Oregon Coast shellfish to complete survey

PORTLAND, Ore.—State health officials are asking people who recently harvested or ate any shellfish from the Oregon Coast to complete a survey as part of an investigation of illnesses linked to shellfish biotoxins.

On May 28, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) urged people to throw out mussels gathered from beaches between Seal Rock State Park north to the Washington border after cases of paralytic shellfish poisoning were reported to the agency. The shellfish were harvested at beaches in Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsop counties.

OHA is now asking people who harvested or ate Oregon shellfish since May 13 to take a short survey to help investigators identify a possible cause of the outbreak and how many people became sick. Responses are secure and confidential, and will help OHA Public Health Division investigators learn more about the sources and size of this outbreak.

Those who already completed an interview with their local public health agency do not need to complete the survey.

Contact Rosalie Trevejo (osalie.trevejo2@oha.oregon.gov“>rosalie.trevejo2@oha.oregon.gov) or June Bancroft (ancroft@oha.oregon.gov“>june.e.bancroft@oha.oregon.gov) of OHA’s Public Health Division with any questions or concerns about the survey.

On May 23, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) closed a stretch of Oregon Coast to mussel harvesting from Seal Rock State Park north to Cape Lookout due to high levels of PSP. The mussel harvest closure was extended from Seal Rock State Park north to the Washington border on May 26.

People who experience any symptoms of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) – numbness of the mouth and lips, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, and in severe cases, shortness of breath or irregular heartbeat – should immediately contact a health care provider. They can also get advice by calling the Oregon Poison Center at 800-222-1222.

PSP is a foodborne illness caused by saxitoxins produced by marine algae and caused by eating shellfish contaminated with the naturally occurring biotoxin, including scallops, mussels, clams, oysters and cockles, as well as some fish and crabs, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). There is no antidote for PSP – treatment involves supportive care and, if necessary, respiratory support.

For additional information:

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife — Responders continue to survey beaches along the Oregon and Washington coasts for tar-like patties and impacted wildlife.

The substance has been determined to be petroleum-based. • Report oiled wildlife to 1-800-22-BIRDS. • Call 211 for questions not related to oiled wildlife.

• Please leave cleanup to professional responders who are trained and equipped to handle this type of material. Responders are actively working to clean up beaches.

• If you come into contact with the beach tar, wash the area with soap or degreasing dishwashing detergent and water. Avoid using solvents, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel or similar products.

For the latest updates please visit ordeq.org/beach-tar. This site will be updated regularly.

DEQ and Other State and Federal Agencies Responding To Report of Mysterious Tar Patties and Oiled Birds Being Found On Oregon Coast

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), as well as federal agencies, are responding Thursday to the report of pieces of tar found on beaches along the Oregon Coast.

Tar balls, oiled birds found on Oregon and Washington coasts

Agencies received a report of pieces of tar in patties on Wednesday at Cannon Beach. The Coast Guard confirmed tar patties on Cannon Beach. The ODFW reported finding tar patties on Thursday near Lincoln City on the central Oregon Coast.

The agencies and partner agencies in Washington are forming a unified command to guide response in both states. The report at Cannon Beach and finding at Lincoln City comes after the discovery of multiple birds affected by a tar-like substance along the shoreline in northern Oregon and southern Washington, as well as tar balls in southern Washington.

We strongly advise the public not to handle any tar or oily product found or attempt to assist affected wildlife along the shore, but to report these findings to 1-800-22-BIRDS (1-800-222-4737).

Untrained handling of affected wildlife is dangerous to the animals and any individuals attempting to help. The U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies are working together to determine the source of the tar-like substance. The source is unknown.

White text over a dark blue background says "How to get beach tar off your skin, hair, clothes and pets: Wash with soap and water, baby oil or dish detergent and water." The Oregon Department of Emergency Management Logo is below the text, followed by a link for ordeq.org/beach-tar

OHA Kicks off 2024 Oregon Beach Monitoring Season

Agency shares list of monitored beaches for May-September

—The Oregon Beach Monitoring Program (OBMP) is kicking off the 2024 beach monitoring season by announcing the list of coastal recreation areas it will be keeping an eye on for bacteria during summer and early fall.

The 24 beaches on the list that the OBMP, based at the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Public Health Division, is publishing includes some of the most frequently visited beaches in Oregon. It also includes beaches where the program has found bacteria present, or beaches for which local partners and the public have requested monitoring due to potential pollution concerns.

The following are Oregon beaches being monitored during 2024, including beach name, and the city and county in which they are located:

Beach monitoring season runs from mid-May to mid-September. Beach advisories are only issued for beaches that are actively being monitored within this sampling window. Other beaches will be investigated for inclusion in the next beach monitoring season.

OBMP works with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to identify beaches that need monitoring based on several established criteria. These criteria include: pollution hazards present; previous beach monitoring data that identify water quality concerns; type and amount of beach use; and public input.

As part of an adaptive sampling plan, beaches and sampling locations are routinely re-evaluated to ensure available resources best protect public health. A copy of DEQ’s beach evaluation is available upon request.

For more information and current beach monitoring conditions please visit: www.healthoregon.org/beach, or contact OBMP at each.Health@odhsoha.oregon.gov“>Beach.Health@odhsoha.oregon.gov or 971-673-0400.

Free Household Hazardous Waste Roundup in Florence on Friday, June 7, and Saturday, June 8

The free Household Hazardous Waste Roundup will collect up to 35 gallons of household hazardous waste per customer on Friday, June 7, and Saturday, June 8, in Florence. Hazardous waste from businesses, schools, churches, government agencies or non-profits may be subject to disposal fees and those organizations must pre-register for the event.

When:  Friday, June 7, 12:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. and Saturday, June 8, 8:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

Where: Florence Transfer Site (2820 N. Rhododendron Drive)

Who: All community members are welcome to participate in the roundup. 

What to bring:

Up to 35 gallons of paint, household cleaners, lawn and garden chemicals, car care products, arts and crafts products, pool chemicals, fluorescent lamps and other household hazardous waste. Check labels for words like flammable, corrosive, poison, caution, and danger.

Please don’t bring: 

Empty containers, drums, radioactive or infectious waste, asbestos, pressurized cylinders, or explosives. Any empty containers can be safely thrown in the trash. For information about disposal of radioactive waste, asbestos or explosives call 541-682-3828.

What about hazardous waste from businesses?

Businesses that generate small amounts of hazardous waste may pre-register to bring that waste to this event. Businesses must pay for disposal of the waste, but most can save money by using this program rather than hiring a contractor. 

Electronics Recycling

The Cottage Grove, Creswell, Florence, Marcola, Oakridge, Rattlesnake, Veneta and Vida transfer stations accept the following items for free during normal operating hours: televisions, computer monitors, CPUs, printers, phones and laptops.  Maximum seven items per day. No commercial or floor-standing copiers, parts or dismantled units. 

Please call 541 682-4120 for more information about hazardous waste disposal for households or businesses.

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Douglas County authorities report that they have issued a warrant for the suspect in last month’s destruction of 18,000 juvenile salmon at the Reedsport hatchery. 

20-year-old Joshua Alexander Heckathorn of Gardiner did not show up at court on Monday. He had been scheduled for his first court appearance on May 16th, but told officials he had transportation issues and couldn’t make it.

But with his failure to make his rescheduled appearance, Douglas County Circuit Court Judge Jason Thomas issued a bench warrant for Heckathorn. 

The warrant allows law enforcement to detain Heckathorn and bring him in on $10,000 bail.

Heckathorn is accused of breaking into the Reedsport hatchery and pouring bleach into a tank with thousands of young Chinook salmon. He’s charged with burglary, criminal trespass, and criminal mischief. 

Lincoln County Announces Low Income Program To Help Spay And Neuter Pets

Lincoln County has announced it will use some of its federal relief funds for a spay and neuter service to help counter dog and cat overpopulation that was substantially worsened by the Covid-19 pandemic.

The program is for local low-income households that cannot afford spay and neuter services for their pets. County staff will work with applicants and participating veterinarians’ offices to coordinate and submit payment for the procedures.

To qualify, people must be a resident of Lincoln County and income eligible, which can be confirmed by showing eligibility for SNAP/TANF; WIC; OHP; Medicaid; housing assistance; supplemental social security income; veterans pension benefits; and surviving spouse pension benefits.

The applications are online. For the English version go here; for the Spanish version, go here.

For assistance filling out the application, call the helpline at 541-270-3393. Friends of the Lincoln County Animal Shelter has volunteered to help answer questions on the helpline and assist applicants who do not have access to computers.

“Our county fell woefully behind in spaying and neutering during the pandemic, when many vets had to suspend elective surgeries altogether, and after the fires of fall 2020, which meant financial hardship for many residents,” said FOLCAS president Emily DeHuff. “These subsidies will go a long way in getting spay/neuter rates back on track.”

People who do not meet the income qualification for the county program can apply for spay/neuter and other veterinary care assistance through other programs administered by the humane society by visiting www.centralcoasthumanesociety.com and completing a request for assistance form. (SOURCE)

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Emergency Volunteer Corps of Nehalem Bay

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Governor Kotek, Senator Wyden, Congresswoman Bonamici, Other Leaders Kick Off Clean Tech Manufacturing Task Force

Governor and Senator Wyden co-convene Clean Tech Manufacturing Task Force to advance Oregon’s transition to a clean energy economy

Last Thursday, Governor Tina Kotek, Senator Ron Wyden, Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici, and leaders in the public and private sectors kicked off the first meeting of the Clean Tech Manufacturing Task Force.

The Clean Tech Task Force, which is co-chaired by Governor Kotek, Senator Wyden and Daimler Truck North America president and CEO John O’Leary, seeks to galvanize Oregon’s competitiveness in attracting, expanding, and sustaining new and existing clean energy technology manufacturers. This task force will work to leverage opportunities from the federal Inflation Reduction Act, which includes roughly $60 billion in tax credits, direct loans, and grants for domestic manufacturing across the clean energy supply chain.

Founding organizations include the Oregon Business Council, Oregon Environmental Council, Oregon BlueGreen Alliance, Oregon Business for Climate, and Technology Association of Oregon.

“Oregonians understand the challenges and opportunities ahead of us in the face of accelerating climate change, and Oregon is a leader in manufacturing,” Governor Kotek said. “We have the know-how and commitment to grow our role in clean tech manufacturing. This task force will be the catalyst to get us there.”

“There’s a lot of green in blue-collar domestic manufacturing jobs now and in the future,” Senator Wyden said. “And this week’s successful kickoff of Oregon’s clean tech task force begins the path for our state to best take advantage of the historic clean energy investment credits I worked to pass into federal law. I’m proud to co-chair this task force and confident it will succeed, given the proven road map for achievements made by a similar task force on semiconductors.”

“Climate change means temperatures are rising and weather events are more severe, but Oregon has what it takes to justly transition to a clean energy economy – innovative advanced technologies, great public universities, strong workforce partnerships, and bold leadership,” Congresswoman Bonamici said. “The new Clean Tech Manufacturing Task Force will help Oregon attract, expand, and sustain clean energy jobs and grow the clean energy workforce by leveraging investments through the Inflation Reduction Act. I look forward to working with Task Force members toward a cleaner, healthier, and brighter future.”

“What we do here in the near future has the potential for huge impact on the state’s job market and economy, and could firmly establish Oregon as a leading state for clean technology development,” said John O’Leary, president and CEO of Daimler Truck North America. “I’m truly excited at what we stand to achieve here together in this Clean Tech Task Force.”

“We are still in the early stages of the growth curve of the energy storage market with immense opportunity ahead,” said Joseph Lu, founder of Powin Energy and CEO of QPO Energy. “This task force will be a great opportunity for the local cleantech business community to influence policy making and appropriation of IRA funds, in order to maximize job growth and to establish Oregon as a cleantech powerhouse.”

The Task Force will propose solutions to addressing barriers to expanding Oregon’s leadership in clean technology manufacturing, including:
• Industrial land and infrastructure;
• Incentives and procurement;
• Workforce development and job creation;
• Research, innovation, and entrepreneurship;
• Transmission capacity; and
• Regulatory environment.

The findings will be consolidated into a final Oregon Clean Energy Technology Manufacturing Report later this year.

A federal appeals court on Friday upheld a ruling that Oregon defendants must be released from jail after seven days if they don´t have a defense attorney.

In its decision, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals called Oregon’s public defense system a “Sixth Amendment nightmare,” OPB reported, referring to the part of the U.S. Constitution that guarantees people accused of crimes the right to a lawyer. The opinion said Oregon is responsible for upholding legal protections for criminal defendants.

Oregon has struggled for years to address its public defender crisis. As of Friday, more than 3,200 defendants did not have a public defender, a dashboard from the Oregon Judicial Department showed. Of those, about 146 people were in custody, but fewer people were expected to be impacted by Friday’s ruling, according to OPB.

An Office of Public Defense Services draft report from March found that Oregon needs 500 additional attorneys to meet its obligations, OPB reported. State officials have sought to address the issue, including by taking such steps as providing additional funding, but structural issues remain.

Sharp rise in Oregon pertussis cases prompts public health warning

Vaccine-preventable disease known as whooping cough can be deadly for infants

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon health officials are concerned about a sharp increase in cases of pertussis – known as whooping cough – across nine counties and are encouraging people to get vaccinated against the disease.

As of May 29, 178 pertussis cases have been reported to Oregon Health Authority’s Public Health Division. That’s a 770% increase from the 20 cases reported by that date in 2023. However, the 2024 numbers are roughly in line with those seen during similar time frames in the immediate pre-pandemic years, including 2019, when there were 93 cases, and 2018, which saw 248 cases.

Pertussis is cyclical, and before the COVID-19 pandemic – when restrictions that included masking requirements and school closures were in effect – pertussis peaked every three to five years. In 2012, 910 cases were reported, the highest annual count since 1953.

“Our concern is with how quickly we jumped to such a high number of pertussis cases, which tell us that the disease is doing what it does best: spreading fast and taking a greater toll on undervaccinated persons,” said Paul Cieslak, M.D., medical director for communicable diseases and immunizations at the Public Health Division.

Among the nine counties with reported pertussis to date in 2024, Lane County leads with 64 cases, followed by Multnomah (41), Clackamas (33), Deschutes (15), Washington (13), and Jefferson (8). Three other counties have also seen cases. School-aged children and adolescents account for 92 (52%) of cases. Among them, only 51 (55%) are up to date with recommended pertussis vaccinations.

Infants are at highest risk of pertussis-related complications and death, and they have the highest reported incidence rate. Between 2003 and 2023, infants accounted for 12% of cases and 76% of pertussis hospitalizations. And Oregon pertussis deaths have been limited to infants – five have occurred since 2003.

Babies too young to have been fully vaccinated are most likely to be hospitalized with pertussis. Cieslak said that pregnant people can protect their young babies by getting Tdap vaccine – which protects a person against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis – at 27–36 weeks’ gestation. The mothers will make antibodies and pass them to their babies across the placenta, protecting them from birth. Among 16 infant cases reported in Oregon to date in 2024, only one mother had a documented dose of Tdap during the pregnancy.

When an infant or pregnant person is in the household of someone with pertussis, all household members should receive a course of antibiotics effective against Bordetella pertussis – typically, a five-day course of azithromycin.

Vaccination against pertussis is routinely recommended for infants, children, adolescents and adults. Children should receive the DTaP vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis at 2, 4, 6 and 15 to 18 months, and again at age 4 to kindergarten age.

All persons ages 10 and older should receive a single dose of Tdap.

Oregon has the highest rate of vehicle collisions on the West Coast.

The Oregon Zoo and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife have developed a project to identify the deadliest roads. The iNaturalist Roadkills of Oregon project asks you to take photos of animals killed by cars.

The picture will be uploaded into an app, so biologists will be able to track areas where the most collisions occur. Currently, only large animals like deer and elk are tracked. This project will monitor all animals that are killed.

Roadways and vehicular traffic are a significant contributor to fragmentation of habitat and impacts to wildlife, including injury and mortality. The purpose of this project is to improve our understanding of the impacts of roads on Oregon’s wildlife, and to identify roadkill hot spots and vulnerabilities among a diversity of animals, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates. This information can help reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions and make roadways safer. Please go to: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/roadkills-of-oregon/journal

Study Finds Oregonians With Addiction And Mental Health Problems Face Difficulty Finding Care 

Many Oregon providers don’t integrate the two treatments in their practice

People who simultaneously suffer from mental health conditions and drug addiction face difficulties in Oregon finding providers who can treat both, a state study has found.

The OHSU-PSU School of Public Health study, commissioned by the Oregon Health Authority, determined that people with both conditions – called a co-occuring disorder – often have to surmount barriers to treatment, from long waits for care to a lack of providers that accept Medicare, which mostly covers seniors, or Medicaid, which covers low-income Oregonians.

The study — drawn from provider data — found that 82% of mental health providers and 40% of addiction treatment providers can treat people for co-occurring disorders. The study did not analyze the number of people in treatment or who are unable to access care, but noted that gaps exist throughout the system.

Beyond the study’s overall figures, it found differences among providers.

They include:

  • Only half of mental health providers offer combined treatment for mental illness and addiction with the same clinician or treatment team.
  • Treatment for both conditions is least likely in a hospital or substance use residential treatment facility, which often serve those with more severe illness.
  • Only about half of the treatment providers treat gambling disorders.
  • Many practices don’t accept Medicare or Medicaid, which could mean that patients can’t pay for treatment.

The study also found that workforce shortages are partly to blame for the lack of dual-trained professionals. READ MORE: https://oregoncapitalchronicle.com/2024/05/29/study-oregonians-with-addiction-and-mental-health-problems-face-difficulty-finding-care/

Sheriff Deputies Arrest Suspect in Rural Shady Cove Homicide 

SHADY COVE, Ore. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) deputies responded to a potential homicide call today, June 1st at 11:03 a.m. in rural Shady Cove. ECSO Dispatch received the 911 call for a possible homicide with an armed suspect on scene at a property in the 23000 block of Highway 62 north of Shady Cove. JCSO Deputies arrived with the SWAT Bearcat to locate the armed suspect. 

ECSO Dispatch received another 911 call for the potential suspect at the Trail market in Trail, Ore. JCSO deputies responded to the market and took the suspect into custody without incident. The victim’s name will be released pending next-of-kin notification.

JCSO Medical Examiners arrived to the scene of the crime to begin the death investigation. Cause of death is pending the autopsy by an Oregon State Police forensic pathologist. Detectives from JCSO and Central Point Police Department responded to the scene to assume the homicide investigation.

The suspect, Travis Clayton Driver, 34, of Shady Cove, is in custody charged with second-degree murder. He is lodged in the Jackson County Jail.

This case is open and ongoing with detectives continuing their investigation. Jackson County District Attorney’s Office will prosecute the case. There is no further information available for release at this time.

Man Arrested After Taking Children Hostage in Ashland Apartment Leading to Multi-Hour Standoff 

ASHLAND, Ore. – Two children are safe, and a Central Point man is in jail today after Ashland Police Department (APD) responded to a call for a suicidal, potentially armed man taking children hostage in an Ashland apartment last night. The call came into ECSO Dispatch at 5:53 p.m. on Thursday, May 30 with information the man was holding two children, ages 4 and 7, hostage in an apartment in the 300 block of Engle Street in Ashland. After a nearly 7-hour standoff with police, the man is in the Jackson County Jail, and the children are safe.

APD lodged the suspect, Erik Macias, 36, of Central Point, on charges of felony fourth-degree domestic violence assault, domestic violence menacing, coercion, and driving while suspended. Macias also had two outstanding felony warrants including fourth-degree domestic violence assault, and driving under the influence of intoxications (DUII).

Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) SWAT and Crisis Negotiators Team (CNT) responded to assist APD just before 9 p.m. The SWAT team and APD surrounded the apartment while detectives applied for a search warrant. CNT made phone contact with the suspect and attempted to negotiate for approximately three hours. When negotiations failed, the SWAT team used a diversionary device (flash bang) outside the apartment along with JCSO K9 announcements, and made entry into the apartment. SWAT arrested the suspect without incidence, and rescued the children at 12:42 a.m. The children are safe and were returned to their mother.

This case is open and ongoing, with APD following additional leads. There is no further information available for release at this time.

SUMMER ALERT: Blood and platelet donors needed now — American Red Cross – Cascades Region

Red Cross provides support to communities devastated by recent storms

— The American Red Cross critically needs blood and platelet donors now following a concerning decrease in donations as the country has experienced an increase in severe weather systems and historic travel.In fact, over the past month about 20,000 fewer blood donations were collected than needed to maintain the Red Cross-national blood supply.

According to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), five of the busiest travel days ever happened this month and more record-breaking travel is expected this summer — a busy time when many regular donors may be unable to give. Additionally, as the U.S. approaches what AAA calls the “100 deadliest days” of summer for auto accidents, it is critical hospitals have lifesaving blood products on hand for all trauma and accident victims who count on transfusions when there is no time to waste. In some of the most-dire situations, medical teams may need to use hundreds of blood products to save a life.

“Emergencies take many forms – some arising in a hospital and others arising as relentless and devastating storms,” said Priscilla Fuentes, regional executive of the Red Cross Cascades Region. “Unfortunately, our community has been no stranger to emergencies these past few years, but when I witness communities come together – at a blood drive or after a disaster – I see us growing stronger and becoming more resilient. Together, we can provide help and hope that is very much needed right now.”

Storm response efforts: The holiday weekend brought the busiest severe weather day of the year so far, with 26 reported tornadoes across 10 states.

With the most active year for tornadoes since 2017, hundreds of Red Cross disaster workers, including more than 20 from our region, are working around the clock with partners across multiple states to make sure people affected by this severe weather have a safe place to stay, food, relief supplies and emotional and spiritual support. Emergency shelters are open in some of the hardest hit areas. Red Cross disaster workers are helping assess the damage where it is safe to do so with preliminary reports indicating nearly 3,000 homes either destroyed or with major damage across the country.

The Red Cross is monitoring the weather and standing by to open additional shelters if needed. Should new communities be impacted, the organization will be on the ground providing help in the days and weeks to come.

How to help: Individuals are urged to help those facing emergencies – whether they need a lifesaving blood transfusion or shelter from the storm.

  • Make a blood donation appointment by downloading the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting RedCrossBlood.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years old and younger must meet certain height and weight requirements.
  • Featured blood drive: Saturday, June 8, Portland Chapter Building 3131 N. Vancouver Ave. Go to RedCrossBlood.org for times or other dates and locations.
  • Help people affected by disasters like flooding and countless other crises by making a financial donation to Red Cross Disaster Relief today at redcross.org or via 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Your gift enables the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters big and small.
  • Put on a red vest and join us as a volunteer today to provide relief and hope when it matters most. Visit redcross.org/volunteertoday to sign up for local opportunities, like our Disaster Action Team, or Bood Donor Ambassador Program.

The Red Cross has teamed up with Tetris, creators of the iconic, best-selling video game, to celebrate their 40th anniversary and build the blood supply for patients in need. In commemoration, all who answer the call to help May 20-June 9, 2024, will get an exclusive Tetris® + Red Cross T-shirt, while supplies last, plus be automatically entered for a chance to win a trip for two to New York to meet Tetris creator, Alexey Pajitnov. See RedCrossBlood.org/Tetris for details.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross provides shelter, food and comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or follow us on social media.

Come to the World Beat Festival to Experience Global Cultures: Ukraine is the 2024 Featured Country

Salem Multicultural Institute is excited to celebrate Ukraine as the 27th annual World Beat Festival’s featured country. World Beat is one of Salem’s premier community traditions, offering a vibrant two-day program of international music, dance, song, theater, food, crafts, customs, rituals, and folklore. This year’s festival will begin Friday evening, June 28, and run through Sunday, June 30, at Salem’s Riverfront Park.

Kathleen Fish, Executive Director, emphasizes that this is the only festival of its kind honoring the Salem/Keizer community’s rich tapestry of cultures. “There are 107 languages spoken in our school district. The festival recognizes and explores the cultures of many of these families.”

The festivities kick off Friday, June 28, from 5 to 10 p.m. with “Friday Night at the Beat,” featuring vocal performances and fire dancing on the Main Stage.

The festival opens at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 29, with the Children’s Parade. Kids who want to participate in the parade will assemble at the Pavilion at the North End of the park.

Each child who attends will receive a passport at the entrance gate to collect stamps from each World Village. Village tents will feature kid-friendly cultural games and activities. This year’s activities include making cherry blossoms in the Asian Pacific Village, Pysanky (traditional egg decorating) in the European Village, Arpilleras (traditional Chilean textile art) in the Americas Village, and crafting Nguni Shields in the Africa & Middle East Village.

Adults can enjoy beverages in the beer garden while listening to live music. Boating enthusiasts can cheer on their favorite teams during the World Beat Dragon Boat Races.

“We had over 25,000 guests attend last year, enjoying performances on seven stages representing more than 50 different countries and cultures. Our visitors come from all over the Northwest and even Canada,” added Fish.

Organized by the volunteer-driven Salem Multicultural Institute, the festival requires 400 volunteers annually to manage setup, stage operations, and cleanup. Volunteers contributing at least four hours receive an event T-shirt and free entry to the festival.

Admission to the festival is $10/1-day pass/adult or $15 for the weekend. Children 0-14, SNAP card holders, and Veterans are free.

You can view a complete schedule and vendor list or sign up to volunteer atwww.worldbeatfestival.org or call (503) 581-2004.

About the World Beat Festival: The World Beat Festival originated in the late 1990s and was conceived by two young mothers, Mona Hayes and Kathleen Fish, who wanted a space to celebrate cultural heritage. Starting with a small gathering in 1998, the festival has grown into Oregon’s largest multicultural event of its kind. www.WorldBeatFestival.org, 503-581-2004.

About the Salem Multicultural Institute (SMI): The vision of the Salem Multicultural Institute and the purpose of the World Beat Festival and World Beat Gallery are to create an environment of openness for all people. In all our activities, SMI aims to be family-friendly, economically inclusive, and culturally authentic. Visit the gallery located at 390 Liberty ST SE, Salem. www.salemmulticultural.org.

Oregon Offers Electric Car Rebates Again – Apply Now Until June 3rd

Home

Due to high demand and limited funding, OCVRP will be open for a short time in 2024. Vehicles must be purchased or leased between April 3, 2024, to June 3, 2024, to be eligible for a rebate.

Applicants have six months from their date of purchase or lease to apply. Low- and moderate-income households can prequalify for the $5,000 Charge Ahead rebate by completing the application now at https://apps.oregon.gov/DEQ/Voucher/apply.

 

 

83-year-old Clarence Edward Pitts walked away from his home in Bandon on Tuesday, January 31 at around 1:00 p.m. Pitts is described as:

  • 6′ 00″
  • 150 lbs
  • Gray hair
  • Brown eyes
  • Last seen wearing an orange beanie, plaid jacket, tan pants and white shoes
  • May have a walking cane
  • Has dementia and PTSD

Pitts may be in a vehicle that was also found to be missing from the home:

  • 1999 Toyota Van
  • White
  • Oregon license plate: WYN 788

If you see Clarence or have any information pertaining to where he may be, please call the Coos County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch Center at 541-396-2106 or the Bandon Police Department at 541-347-3189.

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Contact us: Info@OregonBeachMagazine.com

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